New Video Shows 2016 Honda Africa Twin in Action

A new video has been released online giving the best look yet at the upcoming enduro bike. The video is the latest in Honda’s True Adventure series which is showing the origins of the machine and how it came to be designed. The new 2016 Honda Africa Twin is shown on trails and open plains and looks like the real deal.

The video is also the first time we’ve seen the bike in a white color scheme in addition to the red shown in the first official images of the bike. There’s a lot of hype surrounding this motorcycle but we have the feeling Honda is going to nail it – this could end up being the adventure bike to own and will give BMW and KTM a huge run for their money. When Honda actually does something with passion and instinct they are hard to beat.

The 2016 Honda Africa Twin will be released later this year in Europe with release dates in North America and Australia following soon after.

 

 

Honda True Adventure Part Four: The Snoozing

Honda has released the fourth in its series of True Adventure videos that are acting as a ‘tease’ to the release of the new Africa Twin (or whatever it will be called) which will be released later this year. This video contains a group of Japanese and European men plus a Brit sitting around a table talking about boring stuff to do with the new bike.

If you wait to the end of the video (or skip to it like I did after a while) you’ll get a tiny teaser of the new bike on a gravel road. It’s off in the distance in the top right corner, so don’t expect much.

As patents showed a few months ago, the Africa Twin’s airbox is split in two parts with one mounted either side of the headstock. What this means is that the fuel tank can sit directly behind the engine which then in turn not only lowers the overall center of mass of the Africa Twin, but keeps things narrow up front as well. This will provide it with far more off road cred than say KTM’s 1190 Adventure bike (or dare we say, BMW Motorrad’s R1200GS).

Another benefit of this split airbox design it that the bike’s twin radiators sit just below each of the airboxes which provides the front suspension and wheels with more travel while keeping the radiator further out of harms way of being damaged on rough terrain.

The video is below, but a note to the PR reps at Honda – long, drawn out teasers of bikes that have been shown off already in virtual production form don’t work. People get bored of them and go and buy something else. The Ninja H2 and Yamaha R1 were teasers done right – short and to the point and they were actually teasing in a way that kept us interested just enough.

/end grumpy man mode.

 

Honda True Adventure Teasers Continue

Just last week we showed the latest lot of patents relating to Honda’s ‘True Adventure’ concept, now better known as the returning Honda Africa Twin. Today, Honda keeps the slow marketing campaign rolling along with episode three of their True Adventure video series.

The latest episode takes us to the recently run Dakar rally and is titled ‘The Return to Dakar’. There’s no greater giveaway what this is all leading to than quotes from Taichi Honda (real name), the technical director of the HRC rally team. He states that:

We returned after 24 years because Dakar is the toughest off-road race in the world. We develop technologies here that can lead to mass production.

Having begun to yet again dominate in MotoGP, Honda not only wants to do the same off-road but also take a slice of the every growing ‘adventure bike’ pie. Honda are currently noticeably absent from the segment which is heavily led at the moment by BMW Motorrad, KTM and Triumph.

Technologies that will trickle down from Dakar and events like it will mainly focus around bike geometry and durability, as the engine for the new Africa Twin doesn’t actually comply with Dakar regulations.

As previously reported, we know that the new Africa Twin will feature a 1,000cc parallel twin, a unique split airbox design and controversially for some may also come with Honda’s dual-clutch transmission

 

More Honda Africa Twin Patents Discovered

News on the second coming of the Honda Africa Twin is coming at a slow burn, but the latest patent image discovered shows that what we saw at last years EICMA of the ‘True Adventure’ concept was pretty much the finished product. While there’s no update yet on when the bike will be officially announced, we’re definitely getting a clearer picture of the final product.

The biggest talking point of the machine is its split airbox design. The airbox is split in two parts with one mounted either side of the headstock. What this means is that the fuel tank can sit directly behind the engine which then in turn not only lowers the overall center of mass of the Africa Twin, but keeps things narrow up front as well. This will provide it with far more off road cred than say KTM’s 1190 Adventure bike (or dare we say, BMW Motorrad’s R1200GS).

Another benefit of this split airbox design it that the bike’s twin radiators sit just below each of the airboxes which provides the front suspension and wheels with more travel while keeping the radiator further out of harms way of being damaged on rough terrain.

The new patents further reveal some clever tricks surrounding the Africa Twin’s seat. Unlike as was shown at EICMA, the production version will feature a split rider/pillion seat with an inbuilt height adjustment mechanism. The seat can be moved up and down with ease and as it does so, the front of the rider’s pew slides up the tank.

The front fairing/cowling is a one piece unit according to the patents. While it may reduce production costs for Honda, it probably isn’t the best for owners when they take a spill who then have to look at paying for replacing the entire front fairing of the bike for what may well only be damage to a small part of it.

While off road purists may suggest that the 1000cc engine is too big for true off road riding, it seems Honda is doing as much as it can to make the reborn Africa Twin light, narrow and with as low as center of gravity as possible.

More Honda Africa Twin Patents Discovered