BMW G 310 R v Yamaha MT-03 – New Naked Learner Comparison

Later this year the learner market will be joined by two important new models. One will be a naked version of what is in our opinion the best learner sportsbike on the market (the Yamaha R3) to be known as the Yamaha MT-03. The other is the first in a new partnership for BMW by way of the G 310 R which will see the German manufacturer target the entry level market for the first time. Let’s take a look at what each offers and who is likely to reign supreme in learner naked category.

BMW G 310 R v Yamaha MT-03

For this comparison, the MT-03 is somewhat of a known quantity already. Firstly, other than some ergonomic changes it is the same bike as the Yamaha R3 but with different looks. Secondly, the MT-25, which is a smaller capacity version of what western markets will get has already been ridden and reviewed in Indonesia where it went on sale late last year and reports are that it is a very solid machine.

The brand new BMW R 310 G on the other hand is a clean sheet motorcycle in more ways than one. The engine is brand new, it’s a totally new platform and it’s the first motorcycle to come out of the BMW/TVS partnership which sees BMW design the bike while it is manufactured by TVS factories in India.

BMW G 310 R v Yamaha MT-03

Looks wise, the BMW comes across as uninspiring and very generic. With the white, blue and red livery it’s sometimes hard to distinguish it from the Honda CB300F – and Honda are hardly known for their design flair. Comparing the G 310 R to the likes of the Kawasaki Z300, 390 Duke and MT-03 makes it seem even more boring and benign. BMW has played it disappointingly safe with the G 310 R and given that the S 1000 R looks so aggressive and modern, we feel it’s a missed opportunity by the Bavarian brand to make this bike stand out.

The MT-03 takes most of its styling cues from its bigger brother MT-07 and MT-09 bikes which is a good thing. We’ve always found the new MT range of bikes to be quite handsome and they manage to stand out without looking overly aggressive and brash like Kawasaki’s Z range can sometimes be.

BMW G 310 R v Yamaha MT-03

Fit and finish wise we wouldn’t expect there to be too much difference between the two. While BMW would usually go the extra mile with quality of finish, the fact that these bikes are being produced in India will no doubt mean that typical German attention to detail will be lost. Add to that the fact that this bike will have to compete on price – despite its badge – and there’s little doubt that the Yamaha will sit alongside the BMW without any embarrassment.

BMW obviously sees this as a potential issue to customers and were at pains to point out that quality control would be of the highest order in their press release, a snippet of which is below:

TVS Motor Company’s quality management system has been based on Japanese role models for many years. For the G 310 R, this system was extended to include the requirements and standards specific to BMW Motorrad, and within the area of quality management there are interdisciplinary teams from both companies working in close collaboration.

Furthermore, staff were specially selected and trained by TVS for production and assembly. Additional training programs were held for assembly workers together with colleagues from the BMW Motorrad plant in Berlin-Spandau over a period of more than a year prior to the start of serial production. From the very first motorcycle to come off the production line in India, they have also contributed to the high assembly standards and heightened quality awareness. All in all, production of the new BMW G 310 R is subject to the same quality criteria that apply to production at the BMW Motorrad plant in Berlin-Spandau.

This goes on for two whole pages of the press release. Time will tell how the finished product stacks up. The best comparison that can be made is with the KTM 390 Duke and RC 390 – both made in India and probably do suffer slightly in terms of quality compared to the rest of the KTM range produced in Australia. Again however, we’re comparing budget entry level bikes to higher end machines that sometimes cost more than family cars.

BMW G 310 R v Yamaha MT-03

Our major area of concern with the G 310 R is the engine. BMW chose to go with a single cylinder engine while the majority of the competition has moved towards twins, the exception being KTM and Honda (although the latter is expected to shift to two cylinder units in the near future). And while the 390 Duke and RC 390 are great bikes, one of their weaknesses is something many single cylinder powerplants suffer from – vibrations.

Like the KTM’s, the G 310 R will feature a single counterbalancer to help combat these vibrations but generally speaking, they will still be present at higher revs. These become more noticeable at higher rpm which means that on long highway stints, they can become annoying and fatigue inducing. BMW’s track record with vibrations hasn’t been wonderful lately either, with the otherwise brilliant S 1000 XR suffering from sometimes severe vibrations at certain engine speeds.

Power and torque wise, the Yamaha has a fairly large advantage over the German, whereas torque figures are more closely matched.. The MT-03 will put out 30.9 kW (42 hp) @ 10,750 rpm and 29.6 Nm (21.8 lb-ft) @ 9,000 rpm. The G 310 R produces 25 kW (34 hp) at 9,500 rpm and torque of 28 Nm (20.65 lb-ft) @ 7,500, meaning that the BMW will probably be slightly more responsive down low as one would expect from a thumper.

BMW G 310 R v Yamaha MT-03

But does the BMW have a weight advantage to counteract this power deficit? Yes, it does. The MT-03 with a full tank of fuel tips the scales at 168 kg (370 lbs) – and that is including ABS brakes. The G 310 R will come in at 158.5 kilos (350 pounds) – a not insignificant weight saving of almost 10 kilograms considering the small power figures here which therefore amplifies power to weight ratios. That said, some of that difference is due to fuel tank capacity with the MT-03’s 14 litre tank able to take in 3 more litres than the BMW, reducing the weight difference by about 2.5 kilograms.

With braking, the both the G 310 R and MT-03 make do with single 300 mm discs up front, but the G 310 R takes it up a notch with a radially bolted 4-piston caliper compared to with a two-pot caliper on the Yamaha. The BMW also gets steel-braided lines – a rarity at this end of the market.

BMW G 310 R v Yamaha MT-03

Suspension is similarly comparable between the two machines as well, albeit the MT-03 will potentially be marginally more sharp. Both feature 41 mm forks, with the G 310 R’s being inverted. Travel for the BMW is 140 mm up front and 131 mm at the rear, while the Yamaha is slightly shorter at 130 mm front and 125 mm behind. Handling should be fairly comparable with a nearly identical wheelbase (only 6 mm separates the two), although the BMW does get a slightly wider tire of 150/60 compared to the Japanese bike’s 140/70.

Other dimensions are also near identical. Seat height for the G 310 R is 785 mm and 780 mm for the MT-03. Overall length for the Yamaha is 2,090 mm and the BMW comes in slightly shorter at 1988 mm. However, trail on the BMW is marginally more at 102.3 mm as opposed to the MT-03’s 95 mm meaning that on paper at least, the Yamaha will corner slightly more aggressively and that will be assisted by the skinnier rear tire, too.

BMW G 310 R v Yamaha MT-03

On paper, the G 310 R will have a big fight on its hands. It’s down on power, slightly on torque although it does have a weight advantage. It also looks to have better quality anchors up front. The key will be to its handling and comfort. Will it suffer from engine vibrations like the 390 Duke? And what will the quality of its suspension components be like?

There’s also the price. There’s little doubt BMW will price their bike above most of the competition by way of its badge, but that’s a very difficult ask to make of new riders who generally seek value for money as a main determination of their purchase. The G 310 R also doesn’t really appear to try to win on looks either, although beauty is in the eye of the beholder. We’ll find out later this year.

BMW G 310 R v Yamaha MT-03

BMW G 310 RYamaha MT-03
Engine
Engine Type313 cc 4 strong, single cylinder321cc 4 stroke inline twin
Bore And Stroke80 mm x 62 mm68 mm × 44.1 mm
InductionBMS-E2 42mm throttle valven/a
Compression Ratio10.6:111.2 :1
Valve TrainDOHC; four valves per cylinderDOHC; four valves per cylinder
Horsepower25kw (34hp) @ 9,500 rpm30.9 kW (42.0hp) @ 10,750 rpm
Torque28 Nm @ 7,500 rpm29.6 Nm @ 9,000 rpm
Drive Train
TransmissionSix-speedSix-speed
Chassis / Suspension / Brakes
Front Suspension41 mm fork, 140 mm travel41 mm fork, 130 mm travel
Rear Suspension131 mm travel125 mm travel
Front BrakeSingle-disc brake Ø 300 mm, 4 piston caliperSingle-disc brake Ø 298 mm, 2 piston caliper
Rear BrakeSingle-disc brake Ø 240 mm, twin piston caliperSingle-disc brake Ø 220 mm, twin piston caliper
Front Tire110/70 R 17110/70-17M/C
Rear Tire150/60 R 17140/70-17M/C
Dimensions
Rake25.1º25º
Trail102.3 mm95 mm
Wheelbase1,374 mm1,380 mm
Seat Height785 mm780 mm
Wet Weight158.5 kg168 kg
Fuel Capacity11 litres14 litres

Baby GSX-R Spotted in the Wild, A GSX-R300?

It doesn’t take a brain surgeon to realize that Suzuki has a gaping hole in their lineup currently with no entry level sportsbike on the market. It’s been rumored for a while that a small capacity GSX-R250 or GSX-R300 would be coming out and yet nothing was to be seen at the latest round of motorcycle shows. But it seems Suzuki wasn’t keen on jumping on the hype train as photos of finished production models have now been taken.

Suzuk GSX-R300 001

Other than showing what is a small capacity sportsbike, there’s no further information. The only tell tale signs are the smaller tires and the single disc brake at the front of the bike. Given where the market is moving we’d be highly surprised if it wasn’t a twin cylinder engine, but if the bike is only targeted at developing markets than a thumper isn’t out of the question.

Generally however, even entry level sportsbikes are considered mid range to premium in developing markets and therefore such models need to be sold to western customers in order to recoup development costs. Thus, we’d sincerely hope for a 300cc twin. As to when this bike will be officially unveiled, we’ll most likely get official confirmation in a few weeks when the majority of the press comes back from holiday.

Source: BikeAdvice.in

Yamaha MT-03 Embraces the Learner Market

Joining what is now a smorgasbord of low capacity motorcycles, the Yamaha MT-03 will join the fight and sit alongside the impressive Yamaha R3 as the company’s entry level offerings in western markets. Bearing much of the styling cues of the bigger MT-09 and MT-07, the ‘baby’ MT will no doubt steal plenty of sales away from other rivals – and go head to head with BMW’s new offering as well.

As you’d expect, there’s not a huge difference between the MT-03 and the R3, save mainly for its looks and ergonomics. Being a naked, the riding position is far more upright than the little sportsbike. The upright handlebars offer a wide lock-to-lock steering angle of 68 degrees, giving the MT-03 rider plenty of maneuverability in slow traffic, and Liquid cooled parallel twin 321cc engine will be familiar to YZF-R3 owners this feature also makes the bike easy to move around when wheeling it in and out of garages or parking spaces.

The two-level seating arrangement features a 780 mm high rider seat that gives a feeling of sitting ‘in’ and not ‘on top of’ the bike, and enables the typical rider to get both feet on the ground during stop/start riding. The raised passenger seat gives plenty of space for a passenger, and features aluminium grab bars for added comfort.

No changes have been made to the engine, brakes or any other areas of the bike, which therefore means power of 30.9 kW @ 10,750 rpm and torque of 29.6 Nm @ 9,000 rpm, a 298 mm single disc at the front and a 220 mm one at the back. Wet weight is actually down on the R3 by a single kilogram.

BMW Enters the Learner Market with the 2016 GS310

We all knew it was coming, but now the BMW G310 has been officially announced. The 2016 BMW G310 is the first ever BMW roadster under 500cc and the first single cylinder engine BMW motorcycle in 90 years – and it joins what is a continually growing crowd of learner friendly motorcycles that have joined the veteran Ninja 300 over the past few years.

BMW has taken a similar approach to Honda as the G310 sports a single cylinder engine, though capacity is bigger than the Japanese bike at 313 cc. Output of 25 kW (34 hp) at 9,500 rpm and torque of 28 Nm at 7,500 rpm sees the ‘baby’ BMW enter middle of the pack as far as horsepower goes, but challenges both the Ninja 300 and Yamaha R3 in maximum torque.

Designed and manufactured in conjunction with Indian giant TVS, it features a seat height of 785 millimetres, 110/70 R 17 tyres at the front and 150/60 R 17 at rear, a tubular steel frame and upside-down forks at the front and a total weight of 158.5 kilograms – which actually puts it at the top of the class in comparison to other low capacity machines. As would be expected from a BMW motorcycle, ABS is standard and there’s a range of aftermarket accessosires available.

From a looks point of view, it does bear a striking similarity to the Honda CB300F, especially in the white colour scheme. Check out the full press release below after our image gallery. No pricing or release dates are available yet but expect it to hit showrooms early next year in most markets.

 

The new BMW G 310 R.

1. Overall concept. (Short version)
2. Technology.
3. Design and colour concept.
4. Production and quality.
5. Equipment program.
6. Technical specifications. (Download the PDF from the related documents module)

1. Overall concept. Short version.

The new BMW G 310 R – the first BMW roadster under 500 cc.

One cylinder, low weight, powerful dynamic performance – the BMW G 310 R embodies the pure essence of a BMW roadster: it has neither too little nor too much of anything. Pragmatic in the best sense of the word, it offers precisely what is needed – for dynamic performance and comfort, both in town and out in the country. The BMW G 310 R takes these essential qualities into a capacity segment that is new to BMW Motorrad. As a genuine BMW roadster it masters a range of disciplines: it is just as happy winding its way nimbly and flexibly through the narrow streets of a city as it is travelling supremely and powerfully along country roads. And thanks to its exceptionally low level of fuel consumption and a relaxed, comfortable seating position, it offers the welcome capability of being able to cover a long distance at a time.

At home on the roads of the world.

Newly conceived from scratch, the G 310 R represents everything BMW Motorrad stands for: innovation, quality and of course many years of carefree partnership with its owner. Designed specifically for the world market, the BMW G 310 R can run on the most diverse fuel qualities, meets all emission standards and local requirements – and takes the typical BMW premium aspiration to the segment under 500 cc.

Dynamic roadster design with echoes of the S 1000 R.

The powerfully expressive design of the BMW G 310 R instantly reveals its agile, dynamic character, making a clear statement within its own segment. It has an unmistakeable visual kinship with athletic family members such as the BMW S 1000 R. The small headlamp mask with striking headlamp, dynamically modelled fuel tank trim elements and characteristic roadster proportions with a striking front section and dynamic rear give the BMW G 310 R a mature presence on the road. Precisely modelled surfaces define the dynamic side view. The compact, dynamic proportions and the short wheelbase promise fast changes of direction, while the high rear conveys a lightness that is suggestive of the bike’s sporty genes. In spite of the clearly visible naked bike character of the BMW G 310 R, the side surfaces in body colour create a closed silhouette in athletic style. High-end details such as a standard upside-down fork, quality materials, supplementary fittings and excellent workmanship all reflect the finest within the segment, clearly underscoring the premium aspiration of the BMW G 310 R.

Innovative single-cylinder engine for dynamic riding fun and suitability for a broad range of uses worldwide.

The centrepiece of the new BMW G 310 R is a completely newly developed 313 cc liquid-cooled single-cylinder engine with four valves and two overhead camshafts together with electronic fuel injection. The capacity of 313 cc results from a bore of 80 millimetres and a stroke of 62.1 millimetres. The striking feature of the engine is its backward-tilted cylinder in open-deck design with the cylinder head turned by 180 degrees, making it possible to position the intake tract at the front, viewed in the direction of travel. With an output of 25 kW (34 hp) at 9 500 rpm and a maximum torque of 28 Nm at 7 500 rpm, the engine of the new G 310 R is a very dynamic partner in conjunction with the low unladen weight of 158.5 kilograms according to DIN.

Sophisticated ergonomics and an easy ride response.

The new G 310 R offers a markedly relaxed seating position for relaxed, stress-free and easy-going motorcycling. As is characteristic of BMW Motorrad, all switches and controls are simple and secure to handle.

Great importance was attached to easy and safe operation, taking into account the most diverse rider anatomies.

It banks with ultimate agility yet always remains neutral and predictable. It masters lengthy bends and fast passages with directional stability, displaying athletic talent without any loss of comfort. Extremely compact and with a broad spectrum ranging from comfortable to sporty and dynamic, the new G 310 R simply opens up a whole new world of experience in its segment when it comes to ride response.

Rigid tubular steel frame, upside-down fork and long swinging arm for a high degree of ride stability, precise steering response and sound handling. In terms of suspension, the new G 310 R has a torsionally stiff, highly robust tubular steel frame in grid structure with bolt-on rear frame. The front wheel suspension is taken care of by a solid upside-down fork while at the rear there is an aluminium swinging arm in conjunction with a spring strut that is mounted on it directly.

High-performance brake system, ABS as standard and multifunction instrument cluster.

Like all BMW motorcycles, the new G 310 R is fitted with ABS as standard. It combines a powerful brake system with 2-channel ABS. At the front wheel, a single-disc brake with radially bolted 4-piston fixed caliper and a brake disc diameter of 300 millimetres ensures powerful and stable deceleration. At the rear, this function is performed by a 2-piston floating caliper in conjunction with a 240-millimetre brake disc. The G 310 R instrument cluster has a large liquid crystal display that offers excellent clarity and a wide range of information.

The highlights of the new BMW G 310 R:

  • Innovative liquid-cooled single-cylinder engine with two overhead camshafts, backward-tilted cylinder and intake tract positioned at the front.
  • Output 25 kW (34 hp) at 9 500 rpm and a maximum torque of 28 Nm at 7 500 rpm.
  • Rigid tubular steel frame, upside-down fork and long swinging arm for a high degree of ride stability, precise steering response and sound handling.
  • Tyres 110/70 R 17 at front and 150/60 R 17 at rear.
  • High-performance brake system and ABS as standard.
  • Sophisticated ergonomics and multifunctional instrument cluster.
  • Low seat height of just 785 millimetres.
  • Dynamic roadster design with echoes of the S 1000 R.
  • Developed in Munich by BMW Motorrad – produced in India by cooperation partner TVS Motor Company.
  • Individually tailored optional accessories in the familiar high quality typical of BMW Motorrad.

2. Technology.

The new BMW G 310 R – the first BMW roadster under 500 cc.

One cylinder, low weight, powerful dynamic performance – the BMW G 310 R embodies the pure essence of a BMW roadster: it has neither too little nor too much of anything. Pragmatic in the best sense of the word, it offers precisely what is needed – for dynamic performance and comfort, both in town and out in the country. The BMW G 310 R takes these essential qualities into a capacity segment that is new to BMW Motorrad. As a genuine BMW roadster it masters a range of disciplines. Whether for the daily ride to work or when breaking away from routine: it is just as happy winding its way nimbly and flexibly through the narrow streets of a city as it is travelling supremely and powerfully along country roads. And thanks to its low level of fuel consumption and a relaxed, comfortable seating position, it offers the welcome capability of being able to cover a long distance at a time. Newly conceived from scratch, the G 310 R represents everything BMW Motorrad stands for: innovation, quality and of course many years of carefree partnership with its owner.

Single-cylinder tradition – reinterpreted by BMW Motorrad.

Whether the BMW R 39 – the first ever BMW motorcycle with a singlecylinder engine 90 years ago – the R 25 models or the F 650 series established in the 1990s: easy control, thrilling riding dynamics and high efficiency have always been core qualities of the BMW Motorrad singlecylinder models.

BMW Motorrad now perpetuates this tradition in fresh, cutting-edge style with the G 310 R. Designed as a light, dynamic roadster, it combines athletic talents with solid comfort to make a perfect partner for all situations – due to its low weight, easy controllability and not least an engine that produces lively and vigorous engine power from a single cylinder.

Innovative single-cylinder engine for dynamic riding fun and suitability for a broad range of uses worldwide.

The centrepiece of the new BMW G 310 R is a completely newly developed 313 cc liquid-cooled single-cylinder engine with four valves and two overhead camshafts together with electronic fuel injection. The capacity of 313 cc results from a bore of 80 millimetres and a stroke of 62.1 millimetres.

Designed for the world market and therefore offering compatibility with various fuel qualities, the compression ratio is a comparatively moderate 10.6:1. With an output of 25 kW (34 hp) at 9 500 rpm and a maximum torque of 28 Nm at 7 500 rpm, the engine of the new G 310 R is a very dynamic partner in conjunction with the low unladen weight of 158.5 kilograms according to DIN.

Backward-tilted cylinder and cylinder head turned by 180 degrees for perfect packaging and a high degree of efficiency.

Unlike conventional single-cylinder concepts, the engine of the new G 310 R offers a series of unusual technical solutions. First and foremost, the engine is striking with its backward-tilted cylinder and cylinder head turned by 180 degrees. The intake tract is positioned at the front when viewed in the direction of travel, while the exhaust tract is at the rear. The ignition spark is supplied by a spark plug placed centrally in the combustion chamber.

This configuration not only follows the logic of a straight, power-enhancing supply of fresh fuel-air mixture, it also has positive consequences in terms of the architecture of the bike as a whole. In conjunction with the consecutively positioned transmission shafts, this creates a low centre of gravity that is shifted towards the front wheel as compared to a conventional arrangement.

At the same time, this set-up and the preservation of an advantageously short wheelbase allows for a longer swinging arm, thereby ensuring a stable ride response. The result is agile handling, clear feedback from the front wheel and outstanding control.

The engine concept with the intake side at the front makes for a generously sized intake silencer positioned directly behind the steering head and a very short fuel tank. This prevents any excessive sloshing of the fuel back and forth, so undesirable reactions to uncontrolled shifts in weight are avoided.

High-performance valve gear as in the S 1000 RR, DLC-coated engine components and Nikasil cylinder liner.

Fitted with an electric starter motor, the single-cylinder engine of the new G 310 R offers modern, horizontal separation of the engine housing, innovative technical solutions and a selection of high-quality materials. The valve gear with two overhead camshafts is based on that of the S 1000 RR, for example, while very light, highly resistant rocker arms with a very hard DLC coating (Diamond Like Carbon) that minimises friction and wear are responsible for activating the four valves, likewise as in the BMW superbike.

The valve angle is 11.2 on the intake side and 13.3 degrees on the exhaust side. The diameter of the intake valves is 33.5 millimetres, that of the exhaust valves is 27.2 millimetres and that of the intake pipe fuel injection throttle valve is 42 millimetres.

The resilient and low-friction DLC coating is also used for the gudgeon pin. It enables the pin to run directly in the ground connecting rod eye, obviating the need for an additional plain bearing. In conjunction with the low weight of the cast lightweight piston, this results in reduced oscillating masses. The slide bearing for the lower connecting rod eye and the main camshaft bearing is also by no means typical of a single-cylinder engine, offering benefits in terms of space, weight and durability. A low-friction Nikasil coating of the sleeve for the cylinder integrated in the upper half of the engine housing highlights the fact that the BMW Motorrad engineers have endeavoured to combine lightweight construction, fuel efficiency with modern, groundbreaking engine technology.

Effective lubrication and cooling system for maximum reliability, even in adverse conditions.

The vital supply of oil inside the engine is taken care of by a well-established wet sump lubrication system. Here there is a labyrinth of pans inside the oil sump that reliably counters any lack of lubrication during extreme riding manoeuvres.

The liquid cooling system ensures excellent thermal stability, even in very high outdoor temperatures. The coolant circulates through a generously sized radiator positioned underneath the steering head section.

6-speed gearbox, high maximum engine speed and counterbalance shaft for lively dynamic performance and excellent running smoothness.

Power transmission is via a multi-plate wet clutch onto a well-graduated, constant-mesh 6-speed gearbox. The final drive to the rear wheel takes the form of an O-ring chain. With a spontaneous throttle response, lively pulling power, full-blooded engine characteristics and a high maximum engine speed of 10 500 rpm, the new G 310 R delivers very dynamic riding performance figures for excellent riding fun within its class.

What is more, a rotating counterbalance shaft in front of the crankshaft effectively suppresses unpleasant vibrations, thereby ensuring a high level of running smoothness for the single-cylinder segment. Fitted with a closedloop catalytic converter positioned on the intake side of the rear silencer, the BMW engine control BMS-E2 and a secondary air system make the engine of the new G 310 R extremely environment-friendly, allowing adherence to the EU4 emission standard.

Rigid tubular steel frame and long swinging arm for a high degree of ride stability, precise steering response and light handling.

Extremely compact and with a broad spectrum ranging from comfortable to sporty and dynamic, the new G 310 R opens up a whole new world of experience in its segment when it comes to ride response. It banks with ultimate agility yet always remains neutral and predictable. It masters lengthy bends and fast passages with directional stability, displaying athletic talent without any loss of comfort.

In terms of its suspension, the new G 310 R has a torsionally stiff, highly robust tubular steel frame in grid structure with bolt-on rear frame. Given its good stiffness balance, this provides the basis for excellent ride stability and a precise steering response. The suspension geometry of the G 310 R is designed for easy handling, stability and a neutral cornering response, which makes for maximum riding run and easily controllability as well as reflecting the bike’s active riding character. The wheelbase is 1374 millimetres, the castor is 102.3 millimetres and the steering head angle is 64.9 degrees.

Due to the engine conception and arrangement, the single-section rear-wheel swinging arm made of die-cast aluminium is longer than in conventional designs, though without extending the wheelbase unnecessarily. With its generous length of 650 millimetres, it supports the bike’s high level of neutrality, enables exemplary pitch compensation and makes load shift reactions much gentler. In this way, the new G 310 R combines light-footed handling, maximum precision and a high level of ride stability with benefits in terms of suspension and load shift response, too.

Upside-down fork at front and directly mounted spring strut at rear for a broad range of use on all roads.

The ride properties of the G 310 R, characterised by easy handling and a high level of stability, are supported by the balanced suspension/damper set-up of the directly mounted rear spring strut which is adjustable in the spring rest. The progressively wound spring distributes the spring rates in such a way that precisely the desired suspension resistance applies, depending on the position within spring travel: comfortable for everyday riding, with sufficient reserves when travelling in sporty style and tight enough when hard bumps or road hole edges challenge the reserves. The spring travel is 131 millimetres.

The appropriate counterpart to the control, suspension and damping of the rear wheel is to be found in the upside-down fork at the front. With a slider tube diameter of 41 millimetres and generously designed light alloy fork bridges, this provides a highly rigid composite structure for exact control of the front wheel, thus giving the G 310 R a directionally precise and secure steering response. In conjunction with the perfect set-up of the rear end, it ensures a high level of ride comfort as well as suitability for the most varied road surfaces and therefore a wide range of uses. The spring travel is 140 millimetres.

The new G 310 R is fitted with 5-spoke light alloy die-cast wheels in the sizes 3.0 x 17 inches at front and 4.0 x 17 inches at the rear. The tyre sizes are ample so as to ensure a safe, dynamic ride response in all conditions: 110/70 R 17 at the front and 150/60 R 17 at the rear.

High-performance brake system and ABS as standard for safe braking manoeuvres on poor roads.

Like all BMW motorcycles, the new G 310 R is fitted with ABS as standard. It combines a high-performance brake system with 2-channel ABS for efficient deceleration and short braking distances as well as efficient anti-locking – entirely geared towards optimum riding safety on poor or soiled roads.

At the front wheel, a single-disc brake with radially bolted 4-piston fixed caliper and a brake disc diameter of 300 millimetres ensures powerful and stable deceleration. At the rear, this function is performed by a 2-piston floating caliper in conjunction with a 240-millimetre brake disc. Steel-wrapped brake lines ensures stable pressure levels.

Sophisticated ergonomics for relaxed motorcycling pleasure.

The new G 310 R offers a markedly relaxed seating position for comfortable, stress-free motorcycling that allows for ease and concentration. As is characteristic of BMW Motorrad, all switches and controls are simple and secure to handle. Great importance was attached to simple and safe operation, taking into account the most diverse rider anatomies.

The design of the ergonomic triangle consisting of handlebars, footrests and seat ensures excellent control while also providing very good and comfortable feedback from the contact surfaces on the fuel tank and seat. At higher speeds, the standard windshield also relieves the rider’s upper body from the force of the airstream as well as ensuring an even wind flow at the helmet The low seat height of just 785 millimetres and the short inside leg length ensure that almost every motorcyclist will instantly feel at ease on the G 310 R. Meanwhile shorter or taller riders can draw on the range of BMW Motorrad optional accessories to select a lower variant with a seat height of 760 millimetres or else a higher, particularly comfortable seat at 815 millimetres.

Multifunction instrument panel with a range of features.

The G 310 R instrument cluster has a large liquid crystal display that offers excellent clarity and a wide range of information. The displays include the following: engine speed, road speed, gear, total kilometres, engine temperature, fuel tank level, remaining range, average fuel consumption, average speed, time.

3. Design and colour concept.

Compact, dynamic proportions.

The powerfully expressive design of the BMW G 310 R instantly reveals its agile, dynamic character, making a self-assured statement within its own segment. Reduced to the essentials, the proportions promise straightforward riding fun above all else: the BMW G 310 R is simply a perfect invitation to get on and ride away. This is because the newly developed engine of the BMW G 310 R is characterised by an innovative mounting geometry that signals compactness and agility. What is more, the short wheelbase, low front and high, light rear promise a dynamic, agile riding experience – ideal for manoeuvring in cramped urban traffic.

Despite its compactness, the BMW G 310 R comes over as large and mature within its segment. The small headlamp mask with striking headlamp, the powerful front section and the dynamic rear give the BMW G 310 R a selfassured presence on the road. Seen from the top, too, the BMW G 310 R looks more like a model from a larger capacity segment. The powerful surfaces of the fuel tank give it a clearly defined, muscular look from this angle, too.

Expressive surfaces.

Even when stationary, the precise lines and expressive interplay of light and shade on the side surfaces create an impression of motion and speed. All lines are directed towards the front wheel, thereby underscoring the easy handling of the BMW G 310 R. An especially striking feature here is the side wing contour which protrudes from the fuel tank. Below this, the precisely shaped surfaces echo characteristic elements of higher-capacity roadsters from the BMW Motorrad portfolio, though these are given a clearly distinctive interpretation – such as the side trim that is reminiscent of the S 1000 R.

In spite of the motorcycle’s obvious naked bike character, the generous surfaces nonetheless produce a closed, sporty silhouette. Here the large proportion of body colour and the joining of the body parts without visible bolts conveys the high-end quality feel of the BMW G 310 R.

Exclusive highlights.

The uncompromising striving for quality and high-quality solutions implemented down to the last detail reflect the high aspirations BMW Motorrad is pursuing with the BMW G 310 R. Exclusive highlights from the side view include the standard upside-down fork with golden slider tubes, the likewise gold-coloured brake calipers, and the rear wheel swinging arm.

The aluminium swinging arm with detailed modelling and lattice-like design conveys lightness and stability. In keeping with this, the 17″ rims with 5-spoke turbine design show just what rims can look like in this segment.

Within the rider’s direct field of vision, too, the BMW G 310 R features numerous visual and haptic highlights such as polished embossings and highend materials. The aluminium fork bridge is elaborately modelled as well as echoing the chiselled look of the footrests and rear wheel swinging arm in its own distinct form. On the fuel tank, a high-gloss “R” engraved in the plastic surface acts as an exclusive emblem signalling the fact that the bike belongs to the roadster segment. A further exclusive touch is added by the likewise high-gloss embossed inscriptions on the headlamp mask and number plate carrier.

Individualisation through a variety of colours and materials.

The BMW G 310 R is available in the three strikingly expressive colour variants Cosmic Black/PolarWhite non-metallic, Strato Blue metallic and the elaborately designed Pearl White metallic. These variants offer a spectrum ranging from sporty and modern right through to elegantly exclusive.

The basic colour variant Cosmic Black/Polar White metallic makes the most of the powerful contrast between black and white. With black as the base colour, white accentuation surfaces emphasise the modern lines of the body parts. In the engine area, additional contrast surfaces in silver add a touch of variety to the overall impression, lending a sense of lightness and modern flair to the side in the lower area.

In Strato Blue metallic, the second basic variant, the BMW G 310 R is presented in radiant blue. Depending on the occasion and the rider’s clothing this can give it an elegant, exclusive look or else a touch of sporty flair. The contrast surfaces in Titanium Grey and the silver sections in the area of the engine add variety to the overall impression while also lending a touch of modern appeal. In combination with the gold accentuations of the fork and brake calipers, the general appearance here is one of high quality.

The absolute highlight of the colour range is the top variant Pearl White metallic, subject to an additional charge. (OE). Pearl White is the base colour here – a white with a discreet sparkle effect – against which the BMW motor racing colours of blue and red are applied to create a striking accentuation graphic. The graphic runs from the fork base across the fuel tank and under the seat. What is more, a painted surface in high-gloss black provides the background for the striking interplay between the graphic and the paint finish on the side trim. Underneath, silver accentuation surfaces lighten up the dark engine area, adding a modern touch to it. The fork tubes and brake calipers provide golden accentuations as a perfect supplement to this colour variant.

4. Production and quality.

Developed in Munich by BMW Motorrad – produced in Bangalore, India by the cooperation partner TVS Motor Company.

The new BMW G 310 R is produced in Bangalore, India by the cooperation partner TVS Motor Company, India’s third largest motorcycle manufacturer with a production volume of some 2.5 million vehicles per year. The company has been committed to sustainability for many years and attaches great importance to adhering to defined social and environmental standards which go far beyond what is common practice in India.

TVS Motor Company is the flagship of the TVS Group, which is made up of more than 90 companies in total. These include numerous firms that enjoy an excellent reputation in the automotive sector as suppliers for well-known car makers. Many of these suppliers from within the TVS Group provide the components for the G 310 R.

Quality management and state-of-the-art production following the standards of the BMW Motorrad plant in Berlin-Spandau.

TVS Motor Company’s quality management system has been based on Japanese role models for many years. For the G 310 R, this system was extended to include the requirements and standards specific to BMW Motorrad, and within the area of quality management there are interdisciplinary teams from both companies working in close collaboration.

A dedicated production area has been set aside in the factory for production of the G 310 R. Mechanical production of the engine components is carried out on new, high-quality machine tools made by leading German manufacturers. BMW Motorrad was closely involved in an advisory capacity here and production is set up based on the model of the BMW Motorrad plant in Berlin-Spandau. The engine assembly line is completely new and fitted with cutting-edge automation and testing technology for every stage of the process. All the relevant work stages are monitored and automatically recorded with regard to size accuracy, tolerances and bolt-fitting values.

Assembly is carried out in a completely sealed, glazed area which can only be accessed via air locks so as to prevent any dirt from entering. At the end of the engine assembly line, each engine is put through a test bench run where all relevant parameters are measured including output.

Vehicle assembly is also carried out in a dedicated section of the factory reserved exclusively for BMW Motorrad. Here again, state-of-the-art assembly technology is deployed. The final inspection is performed according to BMW Motorrad standards and includes electronic functional testing as well as a final run on the roller test bench for every motorcycle. The roller test bench is also completely new and set up according to Berlin standards.

Furthermore, staff were specially selected and trained by TVS for production and assembly. Additional training programs were held for assembly workers together with colleagues from the BMW Motorrad plant in Berlin-Spandau over a period of more than a year prior to the start of serial production. From the very first motorcycle to come off the production line in India, they have also contributed to the high assembly standards and heightened quality awareness. All in all, production of the new BMW G 310 R is subject to the same quality criteria that apply to production at the BMW Motorrad plant in Berlin-Spandau.

5. Equipment program.

An individually harmonised range of BMW Motorrad optional accessories is provided which perfectly matches the overall concept of the G 310 R. Optional accessories are installed by the BMW Motorrad dealer or by customers themselves. These are features which can be retrofitted, too.

Optional accessories.

  • Low seat.
  • Comfort seat.
  • Luggage bridge.
  • 29-litre topcase “Basic” with retaining plate.
  • 30-litre topcase.
  • Centre stand.
  • LED turn indicators.
  • 12-volt socket.
  • Heated grips.

Is the Honda CBR250RR Returning?

Could the legendary Honda CBR250RR be returning to the market? The answer is yes, but not in the way perhaps we would have all hoped for. The original CBR250RR was an incredible machine that still has a place in many a rider’s heart today with its inline-4 engine capable of spinning up to 19,000 rpm.

The return of the CBR250RR badge will coincide with the release of a new parallel-twin entry level bike to take the fight back to Yamaha, Kawasaki and KTM with their learner friendly machines. Since the release of the CBR250R back in 2011, competitors have released more powerful and sophisticated machines, relegating the now CBR300R to the back of the pack performance wise.

It had been rumoured since late last year that Honda would heavily overhaul their entry level offerings by swapping the existing single cylinder engine out for a brand new parallel twin. Today Honda announced they would be showing off a concept bike at the Tokyo Motor Show called the Light Super Sports Concept. Other than the lack of any headlights or indicators on the concept (shown below), it’s otherwise production ready and not that different to the current CBR300R shape.

Given that Honda is making this machine to better compete with the likes of the Ninja 300 and R3, it’s not a great stretch to assume that the bike will have a minimum capacity of 300cc once it hits western markets.

Is the Honda CBR250RR Returning?

Is the Kawasaki Ninja H2 A Good First Bike?

Dear TheRideAdvice.com. I’ve been wanting to buy my first motorbike for a while now but nothing has quite caught my eye. That was until Kawasaki announced the Ninja H2. I love cars with superchargers (like the ones on The Fast and the Furious) so I knew I had to get an H2. I know I could get a Busa or a Fireblade for cheaper, but my father is giving me the money to get the H2.

My dad’s really good like that. He wasn’t around much as a kid and I only see him when I need some cash these days, but he’s always generous and gives me everything I want. He’s all you’d want in a father I suppose. Anyway, he did raise one good point that perhaps I should start out on a normal literbike for my first motorcycle, just to be safe. What do you think?

Yours sincerely, Chaz McGuire.

Hi Chaz, thanks for your email. It’s good to see that your father is looking out for you. He raises an interesting question about whether you should get a normally aspirated literbike or start out with or an H2 straight away. Chaz, you sound like a likable fellow and I’m sure you’re a real winner at life, so here’s a number of reasons why we think the Kawasaki Ninja H2 would be a great first bike for you.

1. You won’t need to change gears

The top speed of the Ninja H2 is limited to 300 kph, or around 186 mph. It’s geared so that you don’t have to shift into second gear until you’re well past 60 mph (100 kph). That means you don’t have to worry about changing gears – think of it like an automatic motorcycle. That’s good news for you Chaz, as shifting gears can be hard for people like you and takes away the focus on looking cool.

2. You can speed out of trouble

Chaz, the Kawasaki Ninja H2 produces a massive 210 horsepower – almost more than any other street-legal production bike. That means should the police try and pull you over for not wearing a helmet, you can speed away from them no problem. Sure, you’ll need to change gears but you’ll be able to work it out – necessity is the mother of invention (or learning to change gears on a motorcycle).

3. It’s supercharged

How many people do you know Chaz that can say that their first motorcycle was supercharged? Maybe a few, but you and I both know they’d be lying. Your friends probably ride wimpy first bikes like R6’s or GSX-R750’s. Lame! The best way to learn to ride supercharged motorcycles is to own one. You’re almost at the first step!

4. It’s practical

Some may think the Ninja H2 is just a track weapon, but for you Chaz it makes sense as a daily rider. You probably won’t ever take it to the track, or even the drag strip but don’t let that stop you from getting the H2. When you think about it, the H2 is just like every other motorcycle. Sure, you can’t carry a pillion and there’s no storage space, but you can always stuff the milk and bread from the corner store down the front of your jacket.

In our view, the H2 makes a perfect bike for lane splitting too. Lane splitting is always easier when you’ve got a supercharger. You’ll be able to get through peak hour traffic like it’s standing still – which it probably is!

5. Like the Apple Watch, it’s super technomological

The H2 has all sorts of great stuff. It has traction control (you won’t need it), launch control (but then you can’t wheelie from the traffic lights), ABS brakes (but then you can’t do cool skids), and a quick shifter (it’s like V-TEC). You won’t need any of these things Chaz, but it’s nice to know they’re there.

6. It will make you a better rider

Do you think the best riders in the world started out on tiny dirt bikes or small capacity road bikes? Of course not, Chaz. They went straight to the big toys and learned from there because they’re awesome. You’re awesome too, Chaz and there’s no way to be a better rider than to get one of the fastest motorcycles available today.

So there you have it, Chaz. I’m sure no matter what we said you would have ended up buying a Ninja H2 with your dad’s money, but it’s also no doubt good for you to have some positive reinforcement of what will perhaps be your last major decision in your life.

Enjoy!

2015 Kawasaki Ninja H2

2015 Yamaha R3 Review

The brand new Yamaha R3 is the latest learner friendly sportsbike to hit the market. Given that Yamaha has had longer to work on their entry into the now ultra competitive beginner bike segment of the market, does that mean that the R3 is the best choice for new riders? Can the Yamaha R3 better the Honda CBR300R’s comfort and practicality or the Kawasaki Ninja 300’s outright performance?

If it seems like we’ve been reviewing a lot of smaller entry level machines of late it’s because that so many have been released in the past six months. Consider that only four years ago, the Ninja 250 was all on its own but now is joined by faired and naked bikes from Honda, Suzuki, KTM and Benelli, with BMW joining the party later this year. Alongside the popular adventure bike segment, learner bikes are the biggest gig in town for motorcycle manufacturers.

Not only are they cheap, but they offer the consumer a gateway to the brand. Yamaha no doubt hopes that first time riders who buy an R3 will over time upgrade to an R6 or even an R1. And they may well be very tempted to do so, because Yamaha has made a nearly perfect little motorcycle.

The Yamaha R3 is powered by an all-new 321cc inline twin cylinder engine. According to Yamaha, the development concept behind this new engine was to create a ‘supersport machine you can ride every day’, and the architecture of the new powerplant is designed to ensure good rideability in the low to mid-speed range, together with a strong and responsive character at higher rpm. Thankfully, they’ve nailed it.

While the Yamaha has a small horsepower advantage over Kawaski’s Ninja 300, it’s not really noticeable in a straight line drag. What is noticeable is that you don’t have to continually keep the engine at high revs to access that power – power delivery is available across the rev range and makes for a very rideable machine. That means there’s a good amount of roll on acceleration and you don’t necessarily have to bang down one or two gears to overtake – an impressive thing for a low capacity bike.

The two-into-one exhaust also elicits a nice note and the aftermarket pipes from Akropovic that are already available sound absolutely brilliant. The engine has been mated to an excellent gearbox – shifts were smooth and the gearbox didn’t hesitate once. The fueling of the bike is excellent too – none of the jerky throttle response that earlier CBR250R’s suffered from. In fact if anything, the throttle response is slightly too soft – when throttle blipping on downshifts I really had to twist the right grip to get the engine to rev. This is a very minor criticism of what is an otherwise near perfect setup.

The brakes on the Yamaha R3 are another highlight. Both initial bite and progression were excellent and there’s a good amount of feedback provided for such an entry level machine. Depending on where you live will dictate whether you can get ABS or not. In Australia it sensibly comes standard and in the UK it’s available as an option. For some extremely strange reason, Yamaha USA decided that they wouldn’t even offer ABS – a frankly baffling decision for a motorcycle aimed at new riders.

Up front there’s a 298 mm disc attached to a 2 piston caliper, with 220 mm disc at the back. Our bike launch was hosted on a track with over 20 corners and the brakes felt great throughout – no fade was noticeable. And it was also noticeable how well the front end performed under heavy deceleration with minimal front end dive.

In fact, the bike felt composed all day. While the suspension is hardly groundbreaking it did a good job in providing feedback as to what was happening where the rubber met the road. Perhaps this is Yamaha’s greatest achievement with the R3 – it feels like a small racebike when on the track but on the road manages to be a comfortable commuter. They’ve somehow managed to combine the best of the CBR300R and the Ninja 300 into one package and have done it successfully.

That perhaps is partly due to the fact that our test bike was fitted with Dunlop Sport Maxx tires and not the Pilot Road rubber that comes standard. Unfortunately, those Pilot Road tires aren’t what you’d expect – they’re apparently specifically designed for the Yamaha R3 and use ancient bias ply technology. While we didn’t ride with them, the general consensus is they’re pretty poor. Yamaha’s not alone in taking the cheap option on tires – both Honda and Kawasaki fit bias ply tires to their beginner bikes too and it’s a practice we’d love to see cease.

That is probably our only real criticism of the Yamaha R3. Looks wise, it’s a beauty. The fit and finish is top notch and Yamaha have produced a bike that looks more expensive than what it actual. They also haven’t tried to mimic the appearance of either the R6 or R1 – it has a style and character of its own. Even the stock exhaust doesn’t look too bad, a rarity of late.

Overall, the Yamaha R3 ticks all the boxes. It’s lighter than the Ninja 300 and more powerful than both it and the CBR300R. Its suspension is better sorted than the KTM RC390 and it seems to offer a better riding experience both on the track and on the road than the competition. Yamaha may have been late to the party, but they made their appearance count.

 

2015 Benelli BN 302 Review

The Benelli BN 302 is the latest motorcycle to enter the now ultra-competitive entry level motorcycle segment. And while Benelli has decided to enter the ring with a naked instead of faired sportsbike, the BN 302 is poised to shake up the pecking order with a bike that’s not only priced competitively but is equipped with features that haven’t been seen in this price range before.

Before we go anything further, let’s address the elephant in the room – the fact that the Benelli BN 302 is manufactured in China. The common point of view is that anything built in China is rubbish (though that doesn’t stop millions of people buying iPhones every year). While I only had two days with the BN 302, there was nothing I could obviously see that would cause me any concern if I was spending my hard earned cash on this machine.

Keep in mind also that while the Benelli is manufactured in China, the bike was designed and developed entirely in Pesaro, Italy where the company was founded over 100 years ago.  While Benelli was bought out by the Qianjiang Group in 2005, operations remain in Italy and the factory in Wenling, China uses manufacturing machinery imported from Germany, Italy and the USA.  This is no different to the fact that Honda, Kawasaki, Yamaha and so forth are headquartered in Japan yet a number of their motorcycles are manufactured in Thailand, Indonesia and India.

The specifications of the bike read like something from a class level above. The BN 302 gets dual front floating 260 mm discs with 4 pistons calipers instead of a single disc as is so common for learner bikes. Rear suspension allows for not only for preload adjustment but adjustable rebound too and front preload can also be adjusted up front – many entry level middleweight bikes don’t even offer that.

But for us, the biggest plus is the fact that Benelli have chosen to fit the BN 302 with quality tires. Honda, Kawasaki and Yamaha all choose to put on lower quality bias ply tires on their learner bikes and we’ve been highly critical of their choosing to do so in previous articles. Thankfully, Benelli have shod the bike with Pirelli Angel GT tires. We’d always recommend new riders immediately replace the tires that come standard on the likes of the CBR300R and Ninja 300 with quality rubber which would cost at least a few hundred dollars – with the BN 302, it’s already done for you.

The fit and finish of the bike for the most part appears excellent. Paint quality looks great and all the nuts, bolts, harnesses and so forth appear top quality. There’s some ‘premium’ looking touches to the bike as well, such as the chrome engine cover plate with the Benelli logo on it and the embossed Benelli logo on the seat with which also features exposed red coloured stitching. My only complaint in regards to the appearance is up front – the dash and the switchgear.

Both components are taken from the spare parts bin of earlier Benelli models and it shows. The dash already looks outdated and features some rather uninspiring back-lit icons. Thankfully its functionality is better than its looks with the analogue tachometer and digital speedometer both easy to read and garner information from. It’s very basic however as you only get a trip computer, fuel level indicator and engine temperature display – no gear indicator or even distance to refuel readout. The controls on the handlebars for lights, indicators and the kill switch also feel a little cheap – certainly not up to Honda or Kawasaki standards.

That’s mostly forgotten once you’re out and riding on the Benelli BN 302 though. Thankfully, this isn’t a bike with great parts that are bolted together in a haphazard way. The BN 302 rides as well as it should do as indicated on paper.

The engine powering the BN 302 is a brand new liquid cooled inline twin and it’s a real surprise packet. I wasn’t expecting a small engine from an Italian motorcycle company (Chinese owned or not) to be this good. It produces 28 kW @ 10,000 rpm and torque of 27.4 Nm @ 9,000 rpm. That compares very favourably to the Kawasaki Z300 (29.0 kW @ 11,000 rpm and 27.0 Nm @ 10,000 rpm) and the Honda CB300F (22.7 kW @ 8,500 rpm and 27 Nm @ 7,250 rpm).

Like the Ninja and Z300, the BN 302 delivers most of its power higher up in the rev range. Once you hit around 7,000 rpm it really comes alive, rapidly accelerating and emitting a great sound. Benelli have really put some time into tuning the exhaust – in our opinion making it the best sounding learner bike.

Straight line performance is blunted slightly due to the weight of the BN 302. The wet weight (all fluids but no fuel) is a 182 kg – pretty portly for a bike of this size and displacement. Part of that is due to Benelli using thicker and stronger steel for it. In a recent interview, Qiangiang CEO Yan Haimei stated that Benelli over-engineered the bike to make it solid and durable and able to withstand the poorer road surfaces encountered in many South East Asian nations where Benelli already has a big presence.

The engine is mated to a good little gearbox as well. The clutch action is bang on and easy to use – a definite plus for new riders. The action is smooth and crisp although I did get a few false neutrals in my ride when going from 2nd to 1st gear upon slowing to a stop.

Braking is another highlight and dare I say the BN 302 is best in class when it comes to both brake feel and stopping power.  That’s no surprise given the aforementioned front twin discs. The front brake lever is adjustable (unlike the clutch lever) and provides great initial bite with nice feel and progression.  Unfortunately, ABS isn’t currently even available as an option but may be introduced for the next model year – in fact given Benelli’s presence in the UK and Europe it will have to be in order to meet upcoming mandatory ABS laws in the EU.

Handling is also top notch. While the feel of the suspension isn’t amazing (what is at this price point?), the fact that you can adjust both front and rear preload plus rear rebound is a huge plus – enabling the bike to accommodate a wide range of rider preferences and sizes.

Overall the Benelli BN 302 is a fantastic bike and should be given serious consideration for anyone wanting to purchase a small displacement naked motorcycle. Perhaps the greatest praise I can gifrom a Japanese marque would probably cost $1,000 more given its features. Benelli is planning a massive increase in models over the next few years and if the BN 302 is any indication of what the Italian brand is capable of, then bring it on.

The Benelli BN 302 is priced at $5,590 in Australia and £3,699 in the UK. Benelli returns to the USA later this year and it is expected the BN 302 will be available at launch.