“The Brooklyn Project” S1000R is for Those That Think Their S1000 too Underpowered

Calling BMW’s brilliant S1000R sluggish isn’t the way many people would describe it. Nevertheless for some, you can never have enough horsepower. The guys at Purebreed Cycles have given the BMW S1000R a bit of a makeover and will be producing 40 of these bespoke machines for a cool $US 39,500 each and they’ll be known by the rather awkward name of  “The Brooklyn Project”

Owner of Purebreed Cycles, Guillaume Brochu states that thanks to modifications, the bike now puts down 175 horsepower at the rear wheel – up from 160 as standard. But more impressively, the bike’s weight is now only 380 pounds – a saving of around 70 pounds thanks to replacing standard items such as the seat frame, fenders, wheels and the tank with carbon fibre units.

Visually, there’s big changes to the front end and the bars, as well as the exhaust system, seat and rear lights. It all comes together to be one steroid infused cafe racer inspired motorcycle.

“We believe that The Brooklyn Project offers riders the best of both worlds,” says Brochu, “Owners benefit from the advanced performance technology and reliable modern engineering of the S1000R, which is far and away the best motorcycle on the road, but we also saw its potential as the basis of the ultimate café racer by incorporating classic café racer styling elements.”

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BMW G 310 R v Yamaha MT-03 – New Naked Learner Comparison

Later this year the learner market will be joined by two important new models. One will be a naked version of what is in our opinion the best learner sportsbike on the market (the Yamaha R3) to be known as the Yamaha MT-03. The other is the first in a new partnership for BMW by way of the G 310 R which will see the German manufacturer target the entry level market for the first time. Let’s take a look at what each offers and who is likely to reign supreme in learner naked category.

BMW G 310 R v Yamaha MT-03

For this comparison, the MT-03 is somewhat of a known quantity already. Firstly, other than some ergonomic changes it is the same bike as the Yamaha R3 but with different looks. Secondly, the MT-25, which is a smaller capacity version of what western markets will get has already been ridden and reviewed in Indonesia where it went on sale late last year and reports are that it is a very solid machine.

The brand new BMW R 310 G on the other hand is a clean sheet motorcycle in more ways than one. The engine is brand new, it’s a totally new platform and it’s the first motorcycle to come out of the BMW/TVS partnership which sees BMW design the bike while it is manufactured by TVS factories in India.

BMW G 310 R v Yamaha MT-03

Looks wise, the BMW comes across as uninspiring and very generic. With the white, blue and red livery it’s sometimes hard to distinguish it from the Honda CB300F – and Honda are hardly known for their design flair. Comparing the G 310 R to the likes of the Kawasaki Z300, 390 Duke and MT-03 makes it seem even more boring and benign. BMW has played it disappointingly safe with the G 310 R and given that the S 1000 R looks so aggressive and modern, we feel it’s a missed opportunity by the Bavarian brand to make this bike stand out.

The MT-03 takes most of its styling cues from its bigger brother MT-07 and MT-09 bikes which is a good thing. We’ve always found the new MT range of bikes to be quite handsome and they manage to stand out without looking overly aggressive and brash like Kawasaki’s Z range can sometimes be.

BMW G 310 R v Yamaha MT-03

Fit and finish wise we wouldn’t expect there to be too much difference between the two. While BMW would usually go the extra mile with quality of finish, the fact that these bikes are being produced in India will no doubt mean that typical German attention to detail will be lost. Add to that the fact that this bike will have to compete on price – despite its badge – and there’s little doubt that the Yamaha will sit alongside the BMW without any embarrassment.

BMW obviously sees this as a potential issue to customers and were at pains to point out that quality control would be of the highest order in their press release, a snippet of which is below:

TVS Motor Company’s quality management system has been based on Japanese role models for many years. For the G 310 R, this system was extended to include the requirements and standards specific to BMW Motorrad, and within the area of quality management there are interdisciplinary teams from both companies working in close collaboration.

Furthermore, staff were specially selected and trained by TVS for production and assembly. Additional training programs were held for assembly workers together with colleagues from the BMW Motorrad plant in Berlin-Spandau over a period of more than a year prior to the start of serial production. From the very first motorcycle to come off the production line in India, they have also contributed to the high assembly standards and heightened quality awareness. All in all, production of the new BMW G 310 R is subject to the same quality criteria that apply to production at the BMW Motorrad plant in Berlin-Spandau.

This goes on for two whole pages of the press release. Time will tell how the finished product stacks up. The best comparison that can be made is with the KTM 390 Duke and RC 390 – both made in India and probably do suffer slightly in terms of quality compared to the rest of the KTM range produced in Australia. Again however, we’re comparing budget entry level bikes to higher end machines that sometimes cost more than family cars.

BMW G 310 R v Yamaha MT-03

Our major area of concern with the G 310 R is the engine. BMW chose to go with a single cylinder engine while the majority of the competition has moved towards twins, the exception being KTM and Honda (although the latter is expected to shift to two cylinder units in the near future). And while the 390 Duke and RC 390 are great bikes, one of their weaknesses is something many single cylinder powerplants suffer from – vibrations.

Like the KTM’s, the G 310 R will feature a single counterbalancer to help combat these vibrations but generally speaking, they will still be present at higher revs. These become more noticeable at higher rpm which means that on long highway stints, they can become annoying and fatigue inducing. BMW’s track record with vibrations hasn’t been wonderful lately either, with the otherwise brilliant S 1000 XR suffering from sometimes severe vibrations at certain engine speeds.

Power and torque wise, the Yamaha has a fairly large advantage over the German, whereas torque figures are more closely matched.. The MT-03 will put out 30.9 kW (42 hp) @ 10,750 rpm and 29.6 Nm (21.8 lb-ft) @ 9,000 rpm. The G 310 R produces 25 kW (34 hp) at 9,500 rpm and torque of 28 Nm (20.65 lb-ft) @ 7,500, meaning that the BMW will probably be slightly more responsive down low as one would expect from a thumper.

BMW G 310 R v Yamaha MT-03

But does the BMW have a weight advantage to counteract this power deficit? Yes, it does. The MT-03 with a full tank of fuel tips the scales at 168 kg (370 lbs) – and that is including ABS brakes. The G 310 R will come in at 158.5 kilos (350 pounds) – a not insignificant weight saving of almost 10 kilograms considering the small power figures here which therefore amplifies power to weight ratios. That said, some of that difference is due to fuel tank capacity with the MT-03’s 14 litre tank able to take in 3 more litres than the BMW, reducing the weight difference by about 2.5 kilograms.

With braking, the both the G 310 R and MT-03 make do with single 300 mm discs up front, but the G 310 R takes it up a notch with a radially bolted 4-piston caliper compared to with a two-pot caliper on the Yamaha. The BMW also gets steel-braided lines – a rarity at this end of the market.

BMW G 310 R v Yamaha MT-03

Suspension is similarly comparable between the two machines as well, albeit the MT-03 will potentially be marginally more sharp. Both feature 41 mm forks, with the G 310 R’s being inverted. Travel for the BMW is 140 mm up front and 131 mm at the rear, while the Yamaha is slightly shorter at 130 mm front and 125 mm behind. Handling should be fairly comparable with a nearly identical wheelbase (only 6 mm separates the two), although the BMW does get a slightly wider tire of 150/60 compared to the Japanese bike’s 140/70.

Other dimensions are also near identical. Seat height for the G 310 R is 785 mm and 780 mm for the MT-03. Overall length for the Yamaha is 2,090 mm and the BMW comes in slightly shorter at 1988 mm. However, trail on the BMW is marginally more at 102.3 mm as opposed to the MT-03’s 95 mm meaning that on paper at least, the Yamaha will corner slightly more aggressively and that will be assisted by the skinnier rear tire, too.

BMW G 310 R v Yamaha MT-03

On paper, the G 310 R will have a big fight on its hands. It’s down on power, slightly on torque although it does have a weight advantage. It also looks to have better quality anchors up front. The key will be to its handling and comfort. Will it suffer from engine vibrations like the 390 Duke? And what will the quality of its suspension components be like?

There’s also the price. There’s little doubt BMW will price their bike above most of the competition by way of its badge, but that’s a very difficult ask to make of new riders who generally seek value for money as a main determination of their purchase. The G 310 R also doesn’t really appear to try to win on looks either, although beauty is in the eye of the beholder. We’ll find out later this year.

BMW G 310 R v Yamaha MT-03

BMW G 310 RYamaha MT-03
Engine
Engine Type313 cc 4 strong, single cylinder321cc 4 stroke inline twin
Bore And Stroke80 mm x 62 mm68 mm × 44.1 mm
InductionBMS-E2 42mm throttle valven/a
Compression Ratio10.6:111.2 :1
Valve TrainDOHC; four valves per cylinderDOHC; four valves per cylinder
Horsepower25kw (34hp) @ 9,500 rpm30.9 kW (42.0hp) @ 10,750 rpm
Torque28 Nm @ 7,500 rpm29.6 Nm @ 9,000 rpm
Drive Train
TransmissionSix-speedSix-speed
Chassis / Suspension / Brakes
Front Suspension41 mm fork, 140 mm travel41 mm fork, 130 mm travel
Rear Suspension131 mm travel125 mm travel
Front BrakeSingle-disc brake Ø 300 mm, 4 piston caliperSingle-disc brake Ø 298 mm, 2 piston caliper
Rear BrakeSingle-disc brake Ø 240 mm, twin piston caliperSingle-disc brake Ø 220 mm, twin piston caliper
Front Tire110/70 R 17110/70-17M/C
Rear Tire150/60 R 17140/70-17M/C
Dimensions
Rake25.1º25º
Trail102.3 mm95 mm
Wheelbase1,374 mm1,380 mm
Seat Height785 mm780 mm
Wet Weight158.5 kg168 kg
Fuel Capacity11 litres14 litres

BMW Delivers Fifth Successive Year of Growth

BMW Motorrad has had another year of sales growth with total sales increasing by nearly 11 per cent for 2015. A total of 136,963 motorcycles were sold (up from 123,495 in 2014) which means BMW Motorrad are getting nearer and nearer to their target of 200,000 bike sales in a calendar year by 2020.

The blue-and-white brand’s biggest single market in 2015 was once again Germany. 23,823 vehicles remained in the home market, in other words some 17.4% of total sales. With a share of more than 25%, BMW Motorrad was once again the market leader. The USA followed in second place with 16,501 vehicles sold. The largest single markets follow in the order of France (12,550 units), Italy (11,150 units), UK (8.200 units) and Spain (7,976 units).

Stephan Schaller, President BMW Motorrad said, “Our aim for 2020 is to supply 200,000 vehicles to customers. The 2015 sales figure shows that our motorcycle strategy is taking effect. And based on this strategy we have a lot planned for the years to come. We will continue to consistently pursue our current model offensive in the premium segment over 500 cc, and we will be entering the capacity class under 500 cc with a genuine BMW machine this year – the G 310 R. In the medium term we shall be offering further innovative products in the area of urban mobility and electromobility.”

As Schaller says, the G 310 R will introduce BMW to a new market and will no doubt prove to be very successful in western markets. It’s also interesting to note the mention of electric bikes – though whether that will mean an electric roadbike or more electric scooters remains to be seen.

The largest contribution to the 2015 sales figure was made by the BMW R series with the hallmark boxer engine, accounting for a share of 73,357 vehicles or 53.6 %. As has traditionally been the case, the most successful BMW motorcycle, the R 1200 GS (23,681 units) is followed by the other volume models, the R 1200 GS Adventure (18,011 units) and the R 1200 RT (10,955 units). Meanwhile the BMW R nineT has become a true cult bike, finishing fifth in the BMW ranking list in its second year of sales with 9,545 units sold. The roadster R 1200 R (6,951 units) and the new touring sports bike BMW R 1200 RS (4,208 units) are likewise demonstrating a pleasing development.

Later this year we’ll see the R nineT based Scrambler hit the market which will no doubt also be a sales success, though unlikely to truly worry Ducati with their much more affordable Scrambler. “The signals we are getting from the markets are making us confident and optimistic” said Schaller. “Motorcycles are clearly on an upward trend once again. There is a positive mood in the motorcycle markets of Europe and America. And we are intensifying our efforts in Asia, too – especially in China.”

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BMW to Debut new Motorcycle HUD Helmet at CES

Have you got your Skully helmet yet? Of course you don’t, their release date was pushed back yet again. BMW Motorrad may even end up beating them to the punch as they’re showcasing their own heads up display system in Las Vegas at CES starting tomorrow. And unlike Skully, BMW actually has a history in the helmet business.

Like many of the other HUD systems that have been touted (or actually available for purchase), BMW’s system provides a wide range of data to riders, including tyre pressures, speed, oil and fuel levels and so forth. However, what BMW is bringing to the table that others aren’t able to match is their technology already found in their range of cars.

By means of the future V2V (vehicle-to-vehicle) communication, it might also be possible to display information in real time, for example to give due warning of any suddenly impending hazards. But in there here and now, BMW is proposing that the helmet be able to identify speed limit signs and road hazards to alert the rider.

One thing that has many riders dubious about HUDs is their safety. Is having information in the rider’s field of view helpful or detrimental to motorcyclist safety? There’s certainly no firm data on that yet but if BMW is going down the route of motorcycle HUDs then they potentially see the safety benefits of it.

The helmet, which is also fitted with an integrated mini-computer and loudspeakers, is controlled from the left-hand handlebar fittings using the BMW Motorrad multicontroller. As well as operating the camera, this allows the rider to comfortably select the information he requires.

The necessary information display technology can be integrated in existing helmets, without affecting either wearer comfort or rider safety. The operating time of the system with the two replaceable batteries is around five hours.

BMW Motorrad wants to develop this innovative technology to series-production level within the next few years, thus adding a further safety feature to its already wide range of rider equipment. Just in time perhaps to beat Skully to the market…

 

 

Ducati Multistrada S vs BMW S1000XR vs Aprilia Caponord – Sports Adventure Comparo

If you want to go on a long range ride in comfort with the occasional blast down dirt track but without sacrificing copious amounts of power and razor sharp handling then there’s never been a better time to own a motorcycle. The ‘sports adventure’ segment as it has become known has exploded in recent years and the bikes represented here actually at times compete with superbikes when it comes to technological prowess. We’re taking a look at what we think is the cream of the crop in the form of the Ducati’s top of the line Multistrada S, BMW’s brand new S 1000 XR and Aprilia’s severely underrated Caponord.

You might be wondering why we didn’t include the brilliant KTM 1290 Super Adventure in this comparison. The only reason it’s not here is that despite it’s absurdly powerful engine and huge size, it’s actually more off-road focused than the three bikes we’re looking at here. This comparison is more about sportsbikes with upright ergonomics than ADV bikes with sportsbike features and performance. There’s of course quite a lot of cross-over between the the bikes and you could easily mount an argument for the KTM’s inclusion, but perhaps the soon to be released 1290 Super Duke GT is more in line with our focus here.

Our comparison will use the base Multistrada S, the base Caponord 1200 Touring and for the BMW, it will include both the touring package and dynamic package – which is pretty much the main configuration BMW sells this bike in anyway.

While these three bikes roughly inhabit the same market, they do approach it slightly differently. Out of the three, the BMW is the least tourer and most sporty. In fact as we stated in our review, it’s virtually a superbike with an upright riding position and a more comfy seat. At the other end is the Aprilia Caponord. It’s the least powerful of the three bikes here and definitely looks the least aggressive, but it’s looks don’t tell the full picture. The Multistrada sits in between – it’s still got that Ducati aggressiveness about it, is powerful and agile but at the same time has more touring qualities than the BMW with longer travel suspension.

Performance

Both the Multistrada S and S 1000 XR put out 160hp, the Italian using a L-twin while the German uses an in-line four but of the two, the BMW feels faster – quite a bit actually. We’re not sure why that is given the power to weight ratios are so similar, but perhaps it’s because the S 1000 XR’s engine is plucked from the incredible S 1000 RR whereas the Multistrada’s new engine was purpose built for this machine.

That’s not to say the Ducati is a slouch by any means, but it feels less manic. That’s no doubt thanks to the use of variable valve timing which transforms the previous Multistrada engine into a thing of beauty. It’s smooth, the power is linear and it saves on fuel consumption. But for all that, it does feel sedate in comparison to the BMW. Ironically, it produces more torque than the BMW so you’d expect it to feel quick down low, but this is a case where numbers on paper just don’t tell the full story.

To us, this was a surprise. The styles of engine here – an L-twin and an in-line four – should have made for the opposite. The Ducati should have roared from low speed and tapered off slightly while the BMW should have felt more controlled down low before exploding at higher RPM’s. There just feels like a dull point at the bottom end of the Ducati’s motor. Whether this was done on purpose to make the Multistrada feel more refined we’re not sure, but it means it falls second to the S 1000 XR – but only just – when it comes to the smile it puts on your face.

BMW S 1000 XR

The S 1000 XR’s engine is amazing. No wonder, seeing as it’s a detuned version of what’s found in the S 1000 RR rocket ship.

The Caponord trails by a significant margin when looking at the spec sheets, putting out (only) 125 hp from its V-twin engine. Yes, it does feel slower than the other two bikes tested here, but even so the V-twin is perhaps one of our favorite motorcycle engines around today. It just hauls no matter what gear you’re in or what speed you’re going. That’s is probably helped by the fact it produces 115 Nm of torque at 6,800 rpm – and actually makes the majority of that 115 Nm below 3,000 rpm – this bike is ballistic from a standing start and loves overtaking.

Then there’s the sound. We’re pretty sure Aprilia has an entire team whose sole job is to ensure their bikes sound incredible and they’ve done a wonderful job on the Caponord. No adventure bike – even a sports focused one – should sounds this good.

But it’s still not enough to dethrone the BMW S 1000 XR here. That extra bit of grunt coming out of what is essentially a tamed superbike engine is really a special thing.

winner bmw s 1000 xr

Handling

All three bikes perform beautifully and pretty much will handle anything you throw at them that you can realistically achieve on the open road. Take them to a racetrack and the very sporty S 1000 XR would reign supreme, but we’re only interested in what you can do on the street for this comparison.

Being ‘sports adventure’ bikes, there is a compromise to be made between razor sharp handling and comfort – although all three bikes make use of the latest in semi-active suspension technology to blur the lines as much as possible. The BMW S 1000 XR takes the most aggressive approach, with front and rear suspension travel closer to a sportsbike or a roadster than an adventure bike – 150 mm at the front and 140 mm at the rear. It therefore handles aggressively, sharply and quickly. It loves corners and combined with its gearing and engine characteristics, would probably be quicker in tight twisty terrain in comparison the S 1000 RR.

3-21 MULTISTRADA 1200S

The Multistrada S handles beautifully and is probably the best compromise between sportsbike tracking and long range comfort.

The Multistrada S goes the other way and while not offering true ADV levels of suspension travel, is close to knocking on the door with 170 mm of movement both front and rear. Despite this longer stroke, you’d be hard pressed to say the Multistrada doesn’t handle as well as the BMW. In fact, one could argue that the BMW’s suspension is a little too firm – yes, this is a ‘sports adventure’ comparison but when you’re doing an all day stint, most are willing to sacrifice a few percentages of handling points to keep their bottom end from going numb.

At the other end of the spectrum, the Caponord is perhaps a little too soft. Suspension travel sits in between the German and the other Italian with 167mm travel in the forks and 150mm travel at the rear shock. It feels wonderful on the straight stuff but slightly floaty when pushed really hard in the corners.

In the end though, the BMW gave us the most confidence. We’d love to take it on a racetrack as it would no doubt put some supersports machines to shame.

winner bmw s 1000 xr

Comfort

The Multistrada S’ comfort is really going to come down to your height. The taller you are, the more cramped and uncomfortable you’re going to feel. Ducati has placed the pegs closer to the seat than the other bikes here and in fact has the most aggressive seating position of all sports adventure bikes on the market. That means that those over six feet in height will begin to feel sore after a long day of riding – or even a few hours On the flipside, those a few inches shorter will feel right at home and have the advantage of great ground clearance when in the corners.

Unfortunately for BMW, they’ve snatched defeat from the jaws of victory here – their seating and ergonomics are overall more relaxed than the Ducati’s, but this is a machine that suffers from vibrations. It’s most notable around the 7,000 to 9,000 rpm range and depending on your particular bike, you’ll feel it through the bars, the seat or the pegs – or all three if you’re really unlucky. It’s fine when you’re only riding for an hour or two but if you’re travelling all day it’s really going to fatigue you.

cap 1200 002

The Caponord has none of these problems. It’s virtually vibration free (though you’ll notice slight vibrations at higher rpm), its ergonomics offer a great compromise between tall and shorter riders, the seat is very comfortable and the suspension is the softest of the three bikes here. While the riding position is definitely the least sporty in our comparison, those wide bars still give great leverage to turn in hard when riding through the twisties.

winner aprilia caponord

Farkles

Does he or she with the most toys win? If gadgets and the latest in technology are what you’re after it’s hard to go past the Multistrada S. If you want, it has it. Cornering ABS, a colour TFT display, an app that links your bike to your iPhone, the Ducati Multimedia System, 5D inertial measurement unit, cornering lights, hands free ignition, cruise control and more. It has more features than most family cars have. A lot it is unnecessary but at the same time, you won’t complain that you’ve got it.

BMW S 1000 XR

Heated grips, cruise control, cornering ABS, quick shifter for both up and down shifts – the S 1000 XR is a technological tour de force if you’re willing to pay for it.

The BMW comes close gadgets wise but does miss out on a number of fancy bits the Italian gets – such as no interface to your phone and hands free ignition. But it has a trump card – a brilliant Gear Shift Assist system that allows for both clutch-less upshifts and downshifts. It’s an electronic system as used by MV Agusta and it’s brilliant – you’ll grow to love it. It also gets heated grips which are great for cooler climates.

The Caponord is hardly a simple machine with the tech is features; it’s just not quite as cutting-edge as its competitors. It critically misses out on cornering ABS which the other two get and there’s no quickshifter or slipper clutch as found on the BMW either. It does get a fancy phone interface, a selection of engine modes and traction control settings, but in the end the BMW comes out on top.

winner bmw s 1000 xr

Interface

If it seems like Aprilia dedicates an entire team to create the most intoxicating exhaust note from their bikes, they must then use a single person to design the interfaces for their bikes. Quite frankly, changing settings, modes and even engaging the cruise control is all frustrating and cumbersome on the Caponord.

Cruise control is especially annoying, as you have to try and engage it with your thumb while holding the throttle still – not an easy task. There’s also no button to change the speed up or down – you instead have to get the the speed manually and reset it – not precise and not user friendly.

That’s in direct contrast to the Multistrada S, which despite having more settings and options than the Caponord, is much easier to manage. The S 1000 XR isn’t far behind, though it’s dash is now looking quite dated and is just that little bit harder to learn than the Ducati’s.

winner ducati hyperstrada

Off-road

We ummed and ahhed about whether to put this category in or not. Let’s be honest, these aren’t true off-road machines. They all use sportsbike sized cast wheels, the suspension travel while not superbike short isn’t made for tackling big ruts and rocks and despite their numerous engine modes on offer, don’t come with settings for the dirt.

But despite that, the three manufacturers do like to show pictures of their bikes off road and given that they are sports adventure bikes, it seemed fitting to at least look at their capabilities in passing. Are they capable off road? Yes, just like any motorcycle with road tires are. That means they’re fine on hard packed dirt roads and a small bit of gravel. They can handle slipperier stuff as long as you’ve got the skills to manage it.

1-24 MULTISTRADA 1200S

Should you decide to get your wheels dirty, the Multistrada S with its decent suspension travel will do the job respectably.

Oddly, despite having the least adventure bike like geometry of the three machines, the BMW performed quite well when we took it off-road, as did the Multistrada S. The Caponord probably was the least happy when not on the bitumen, which is probably due to its weight – at 247 kg without fuel, it’s the heaviest here by a good margin. The Multistrada S weighs 212 kg sans fuel while the BMW S 1000 XR comes in just below that at 208 kg. The Caponord is a big bike and it feels it at times.

The extra suspension travel on the Multistrada S, coupled with the wonderful skyhook suspension means that it feels most at home when not on the black stuff and it’s more refined engine helps too.

winner ducati hyperstrada

Value

There’s really not a contest here – the Aprilia is just incredibly good value. At $15,695 you get an incredibly well put together machine with a wonderful engine, fantastic handling and semi-active suspension. Yes, it’s not as fast as its European counterparts here, doesn’t have quite as many features and the dash is a pain in the neck to navigate but you still get a lot of bang for your buck.

The S 1000 XR starts at $16,350 but when you add the touring and dynamic packages on top as tested here, it blows out to over $18,000. That might sound expensive, but the Ducati creates an even larger dent in your mortgage at $19,695. There’s definitely some cheeky badge pricing going on there as there’s no real justification for the price premium over the S 1000 XR.

winner aprilia caponord

Overall

From a straight points perspective, the S 1000 XR is our winner. Its performance, technology, handling and features are all first class, with the Multistrada S close behind. But it’s hard to give the win to the BMW that easily. Despite all its wonderful qualities, those engine vibrations are an issue.

While the S 1000 XR feels much more exhilarating to ride, if you’re out on the road for days at a time, the refinement of the Multistrada S is hard to get past – if you’re the right height for it. If you’re too tall, it’s not going to be a pleasant place to be.

The Caponord avoids these issues. It’s not as quick as the other two bikes, nor does it have quite the same number of features but almost everything it does it does very well – save for changing modes and engaging cruise control. And despite that, the money you save in comparison to the Ducati and BMW is really impossible to ignore.

For outright performance, the BMW wins, but for a bike you need to live with every day, the Aprilia gets our vote.

cap 1200 001

Is the Caponord the best bike here? No, but for the price it’s very, very difficult to overlook.

BMW and TVS Partnership to Expand Beyond 500cc Bikes

Just last week, the first product of the BMW Motorrad and TVS partnership beared fruit in the form of the BMW 310 R. When the agreement came into place it was believed that they would be focusing on working together on motorcycles with capacities less than 500cc. Now however a new report from Bloomberg in India indicates that the two will begin to collaborate on bigger motorcycles as well.

Don’t worry BMW fans we won’t be seeing TVS manufactured S 1000 RR’s anytime soon. The expansion of the cooperation only bumps things up to 600cc bikes featuring twin cylinder engines. These bikes will be marketed around the five to six Indian Lakh range (around $7,500 to $9,000 USD).

Like the BMW 310 R, these bikes will be designed predominantly in Germany while being produced byTVS factories in India. They’ll be badged as TVS machines locally while exported as BMW’s to western markets. There will also be modifications to both equipment levels and styling for the respective markets.

Expect to see the first instance of this expanded collaboration around 2017.

Source: Bloomberg TV

BMW Enters the Learner Market with the 2016 GS310

BMW R nineT Scrambler is 1170cc’s of Air Cooled Fun

The Scrambler onslaught continues and we’ve lost count of how many there are now. The latest as expected is from BMW in the form of an R nineT based motorcycle. Considering that the original R nineT was only a few modifications away from a Scrambler to begin with, BMW are probably kicking themselves they let Ducati get such a lead on them.

Where the BMW has it over the Ducati is in the engine department – a 1170 cc air/oil-cooled boxer that delivers an output of 81 kW (110 hp) at 7,750 rpm and maximum torque of 116 Nm at 6,000 rpm. The engine has been remapped slightly, but this is more to do with EU4 emission standards than for rider benefit.

The exhaust has been raised with two vertically arranged rear silencers at the rear and the front wheel is now 19 inches in diameter. Front suspension travel is 125 mm (up 5 mm from the before) and rear spring travel is 140 mm (also up 5 mm). Other than those changes and a modification of the ergonomics, the bike remains pretty much mechanically the same as the standard R nineT roadster.

Of course, one of the biggest things with all these new scramblers is the cross promotion of not only accessories for the bikes, but clothing and other gear too and BMW has always been on top of this. The R nineT Scrambler is no different, with options including cross-spoke wheels, heated grips, a hand-brushed aluminium fuel tank with ground/visible weld seam, a one person seat, engine guard and believe it or not, you can get an RPM reading on the dash as an optional extra, too. Wonders never cease.

 

BMW Enters the Learner Market with the 2016 GS310

We all knew it was coming, but now the BMW G310 has been officially announced. The 2016 BMW G310 is the first ever BMW roadster under 500cc and the first single cylinder engine BMW motorcycle in 90 years – and it joins what is a continually growing crowd of learner friendly motorcycles that have joined the veteran Ninja 300 over the past few years.

BMW has taken a similar approach to Honda as the G310 sports a single cylinder engine, though capacity is bigger than the Japanese bike at 313 cc. Output of 25 kW (34 hp) at 9,500 rpm and torque of 28 Nm at 7,500 rpm sees the ‘baby’ BMW enter middle of the pack as far as horsepower goes, but challenges both the Ninja 300 and Yamaha R3 in maximum torque.

Designed and manufactured in conjunction with Indian giant TVS, it features a seat height of 785 millimetres, 110/70 R 17 tyres at the front and 150/60 R 17 at rear, a tubular steel frame and upside-down forks at the front and a total weight of 158.5 kilograms – which actually puts it at the top of the class in comparison to other low capacity machines. As would be expected from a BMW motorcycle, ABS is standard and there’s a range of aftermarket accessosires available.

From a looks point of view, it does bear a striking similarity to the Honda CB300F, especially in the white colour scheme. Check out the full press release below after our image gallery. No pricing or release dates are available yet but expect it to hit showrooms early next year in most markets.

 

The new BMW G 310 R.

1. Overall concept. (Short version)
2. Technology.
3. Design and colour concept.
4. Production and quality.
5. Equipment program.
6. Technical specifications. (Download the PDF from the related documents module)

1. Overall concept. Short version.

The new BMW G 310 R – the first BMW roadster under 500 cc.

One cylinder, low weight, powerful dynamic performance – the BMW G 310 R embodies the pure essence of a BMW roadster: it has neither too little nor too much of anything. Pragmatic in the best sense of the word, it offers precisely what is needed – for dynamic performance and comfort, both in town and out in the country. The BMW G 310 R takes these essential qualities into a capacity segment that is new to BMW Motorrad. As a genuine BMW roadster it masters a range of disciplines: it is just as happy winding its way nimbly and flexibly through the narrow streets of a city as it is travelling supremely and powerfully along country roads. And thanks to its exceptionally low level of fuel consumption and a relaxed, comfortable seating position, it offers the welcome capability of being able to cover a long distance at a time.

At home on the roads of the world.

Newly conceived from scratch, the G 310 R represents everything BMW Motorrad stands for: innovation, quality and of course many years of carefree partnership with its owner. Designed specifically for the world market, the BMW G 310 R can run on the most diverse fuel qualities, meets all emission standards and local requirements – and takes the typical BMW premium aspiration to the segment under 500 cc.

Dynamic roadster design with echoes of the S 1000 R.

The powerfully expressive design of the BMW G 310 R instantly reveals its agile, dynamic character, making a clear statement within its own segment. It has an unmistakeable visual kinship with athletic family members such as the BMW S 1000 R. The small headlamp mask with striking headlamp, dynamically modelled fuel tank trim elements and characteristic roadster proportions with a striking front section and dynamic rear give the BMW G 310 R a mature presence on the road. Precisely modelled surfaces define the dynamic side view. The compact, dynamic proportions and the short wheelbase promise fast changes of direction, while the high rear conveys a lightness that is suggestive of the bike’s sporty genes. In spite of the clearly visible naked bike character of the BMW G 310 R, the side surfaces in body colour create a closed silhouette in athletic style. High-end details such as a standard upside-down fork, quality materials, supplementary fittings and excellent workmanship all reflect the finest within the segment, clearly underscoring the premium aspiration of the BMW G 310 R.

Innovative single-cylinder engine for dynamic riding fun and suitability for a broad range of uses worldwide.

The centrepiece of the new BMW G 310 R is a completely newly developed 313 cc liquid-cooled single-cylinder engine with four valves and two overhead camshafts together with electronic fuel injection. The capacity of 313 cc results from a bore of 80 millimetres and a stroke of 62.1 millimetres. The striking feature of the engine is its backward-tilted cylinder in open-deck design with the cylinder head turned by 180 degrees, making it possible to position the intake tract at the front, viewed in the direction of travel. With an output of 25 kW (34 hp) at 9 500 rpm and a maximum torque of 28 Nm at 7 500 rpm, the engine of the new G 310 R is a very dynamic partner in conjunction with the low unladen weight of 158.5 kilograms according to DIN.

Sophisticated ergonomics and an easy ride response.

The new G 310 R offers a markedly relaxed seating position for relaxed, stress-free and easy-going motorcycling. As is characteristic of BMW Motorrad, all switches and controls are simple and secure to handle.

Great importance was attached to easy and safe operation, taking into account the most diverse rider anatomies.

It banks with ultimate agility yet always remains neutral and predictable. It masters lengthy bends and fast passages with directional stability, displaying athletic talent without any loss of comfort. Extremely compact and with a broad spectrum ranging from comfortable to sporty and dynamic, the new G 310 R simply opens up a whole new world of experience in its segment when it comes to ride response.

Rigid tubular steel frame, upside-down fork and long swinging arm for a high degree of ride stability, precise steering response and sound handling. In terms of suspension, the new G 310 R has a torsionally stiff, highly robust tubular steel frame in grid structure with bolt-on rear frame. The front wheel suspension is taken care of by a solid upside-down fork while at the rear there is an aluminium swinging arm in conjunction with a spring strut that is mounted on it directly.

High-performance brake system, ABS as standard and multifunction instrument cluster.

Like all BMW motorcycles, the new G 310 R is fitted with ABS as standard. It combines a powerful brake system with 2-channel ABS. At the front wheel, a single-disc brake with radially bolted 4-piston fixed caliper and a brake disc diameter of 300 millimetres ensures powerful and stable deceleration. At the rear, this function is performed by a 2-piston floating caliper in conjunction with a 240-millimetre brake disc. The G 310 R instrument cluster has a large liquid crystal display that offers excellent clarity and a wide range of information.

The highlights of the new BMW G 310 R:

  • Innovative liquid-cooled single-cylinder engine with two overhead camshafts, backward-tilted cylinder and intake tract positioned at the front.
  • Output 25 kW (34 hp) at 9 500 rpm and a maximum torque of 28 Nm at 7 500 rpm.
  • Rigid tubular steel frame, upside-down fork and long swinging arm for a high degree of ride stability, precise steering response and sound handling.
  • Tyres 110/70 R 17 at front and 150/60 R 17 at rear.
  • High-performance brake system and ABS as standard.
  • Sophisticated ergonomics and multifunctional instrument cluster.
  • Low seat height of just 785 millimetres.
  • Dynamic roadster design with echoes of the S 1000 R.
  • Developed in Munich by BMW Motorrad – produced in India by cooperation partner TVS Motor Company.
  • Individually tailored optional accessories in the familiar high quality typical of BMW Motorrad.

2. Technology.

The new BMW G 310 R – the first BMW roadster under 500 cc.

One cylinder, low weight, powerful dynamic performance – the BMW G 310 R embodies the pure essence of a BMW roadster: it has neither too little nor too much of anything. Pragmatic in the best sense of the word, it offers precisely what is needed – for dynamic performance and comfort, both in town and out in the country. The BMW G 310 R takes these essential qualities into a capacity segment that is new to BMW Motorrad. As a genuine BMW roadster it masters a range of disciplines. Whether for the daily ride to work or when breaking away from routine: it is just as happy winding its way nimbly and flexibly through the narrow streets of a city as it is travelling supremely and powerfully along country roads. And thanks to its low level of fuel consumption and a relaxed, comfortable seating position, it offers the welcome capability of being able to cover a long distance at a time. Newly conceived from scratch, the G 310 R represents everything BMW Motorrad stands for: innovation, quality and of course many years of carefree partnership with its owner.

Single-cylinder tradition – reinterpreted by BMW Motorrad.

Whether the BMW R 39 – the first ever BMW motorcycle with a singlecylinder engine 90 years ago – the R 25 models or the F 650 series established in the 1990s: easy control, thrilling riding dynamics and high efficiency have always been core qualities of the BMW Motorrad singlecylinder models.

BMW Motorrad now perpetuates this tradition in fresh, cutting-edge style with the G 310 R. Designed as a light, dynamic roadster, it combines athletic talents with solid comfort to make a perfect partner for all situations – due to its low weight, easy controllability and not least an engine that produces lively and vigorous engine power from a single cylinder.

Innovative single-cylinder engine for dynamic riding fun and suitability for a broad range of uses worldwide.

The centrepiece of the new BMW G 310 R is a completely newly developed 313 cc liquid-cooled single-cylinder engine with four valves and two overhead camshafts together with electronic fuel injection. The capacity of 313 cc results from a bore of 80 millimetres and a stroke of 62.1 millimetres.

Designed for the world market and therefore offering compatibility with various fuel qualities, the compression ratio is a comparatively moderate 10.6:1. With an output of 25 kW (34 hp) at 9 500 rpm and a maximum torque of 28 Nm at 7 500 rpm, the engine of the new G 310 R is a very dynamic partner in conjunction with the low unladen weight of 158.5 kilograms according to DIN.

Backward-tilted cylinder and cylinder head turned by 180 degrees for perfect packaging and a high degree of efficiency.

Unlike conventional single-cylinder concepts, the engine of the new G 310 R offers a series of unusual technical solutions. First and foremost, the engine is striking with its backward-tilted cylinder and cylinder head turned by 180 degrees. The intake tract is positioned at the front when viewed in the direction of travel, while the exhaust tract is at the rear. The ignition spark is supplied by a spark plug placed centrally in the combustion chamber.

This configuration not only follows the logic of a straight, power-enhancing supply of fresh fuel-air mixture, it also has positive consequences in terms of the architecture of the bike as a whole. In conjunction with the consecutively positioned transmission shafts, this creates a low centre of gravity that is shifted towards the front wheel as compared to a conventional arrangement.

At the same time, this set-up and the preservation of an advantageously short wheelbase allows for a longer swinging arm, thereby ensuring a stable ride response. The result is agile handling, clear feedback from the front wheel and outstanding control.

The engine concept with the intake side at the front makes for a generously sized intake silencer positioned directly behind the steering head and a very short fuel tank. This prevents any excessive sloshing of the fuel back and forth, so undesirable reactions to uncontrolled shifts in weight are avoided.

High-performance valve gear as in the S 1000 RR, DLC-coated engine components and Nikasil cylinder liner.

Fitted with an electric starter motor, the single-cylinder engine of the new G 310 R offers modern, horizontal separation of the engine housing, innovative technical solutions and a selection of high-quality materials. The valve gear with two overhead camshafts is based on that of the S 1000 RR, for example, while very light, highly resistant rocker arms with a very hard DLC coating (Diamond Like Carbon) that minimises friction and wear are responsible for activating the four valves, likewise as in the BMW superbike.

The valve angle is 11.2 on the intake side and 13.3 degrees on the exhaust side. The diameter of the intake valves is 33.5 millimetres, that of the exhaust valves is 27.2 millimetres and that of the intake pipe fuel injection throttle valve is 42 millimetres.

The resilient and low-friction DLC coating is also used for the gudgeon pin. It enables the pin to run directly in the ground connecting rod eye, obviating the need for an additional plain bearing. In conjunction with the low weight of the cast lightweight piston, this results in reduced oscillating masses. The slide bearing for the lower connecting rod eye and the main camshaft bearing is also by no means typical of a single-cylinder engine, offering benefits in terms of space, weight and durability. A low-friction Nikasil coating of the sleeve for the cylinder integrated in the upper half of the engine housing highlights the fact that the BMW Motorrad engineers have endeavoured to combine lightweight construction, fuel efficiency with modern, groundbreaking engine technology.

Effective lubrication and cooling system for maximum reliability, even in adverse conditions.

The vital supply of oil inside the engine is taken care of by a well-established wet sump lubrication system. Here there is a labyrinth of pans inside the oil sump that reliably counters any lack of lubrication during extreme riding manoeuvres.

The liquid cooling system ensures excellent thermal stability, even in very high outdoor temperatures. The coolant circulates through a generously sized radiator positioned underneath the steering head section.

6-speed gearbox, high maximum engine speed and counterbalance shaft for lively dynamic performance and excellent running smoothness.

Power transmission is via a multi-plate wet clutch onto a well-graduated, constant-mesh 6-speed gearbox. The final drive to the rear wheel takes the form of an O-ring chain. With a spontaneous throttle response, lively pulling power, full-blooded engine characteristics and a high maximum engine speed of 10 500 rpm, the new G 310 R delivers very dynamic riding performance figures for excellent riding fun within its class.

What is more, a rotating counterbalance shaft in front of the crankshaft effectively suppresses unpleasant vibrations, thereby ensuring a high level of running smoothness for the single-cylinder segment. Fitted with a closedloop catalytic converter positioned on the intake side of the rear silencer, the BMW engine control BMS-E2 and a secondary air system make the engine of the new G 310 R extremely environment-friendly, allowing adherence to the EU4 emission standard.

Rigid tubular steel frame and long swinging arm for a high degree of ride stability, precise steering response and light handling.

Extremely compact and with a broad spectrum ranging from comfortable to sporty and dynamic, the new G 310 R opens up a whole new world of experience in its segment when it comes to ride response. It banks with ultimate agility yet always remains neutral and predictable. It masters lengthy bends and fast passages with directional stability, displaying athletic talent without any loss of comfort.

In terms of its suspension, the new G 310 R has a torsionally stiff, highly robust tubular steel frame in grid structure with bolt-on rear frame. Given its good stiffness balance, this provides the basis for excellent ride stability and a precise steering response. The suspension geometry of the G 310 R is designed for easy handling, stability and a neutral cornering response, which makes for maximum riding run and easily controllability as well as reflecting the bike’s active riding character. The wheelbase is 1374 millimetres, the castor is 102.3 millimetres and the steering head angle is 64.9 degrees.

Due to the engine conception and arrangement, the single-section rear-wheel swinging arm made of die-cast aluminium is longer than in conventional designs, though without extending the wheelbase unnecessarily. With its generous length of 650 millimetres, it supports the bike’s high level of neutrality, enables exemplary pitch compensation and makes load shift reactions much gentler. In this way, the new G 310 R combines light-footed handling, maximum precision and a high level of ride stability with benefits in terms of suspension and load shift response, too.

Upside-down fork at front and directly mounted spring strut at rear for a broad range of use on all roads.

The ride properties of the G 310 R, characterised by easy handling and a high level of stability, are supported by the balanced suspension/damper set-up of the directly mounted rear spring strut which is adjustable in the spring rest. The progressively wound spring distributes the spring rates in such a way that precisely the desired suspension resistance applies, depending on the position within spring travel: comfortable for everyday riding, with sufficient reserves when travelling in sporty style and tight enough when hard bumps or road hole edges challenge the reserves. The spring travel is 131 millimetres.

The appropriate counterpart to the control, suspension and damping of the rear wheel is to be found in the upside-down fork at the front. With a slider tube diameter of 41 millimetres and generously designed light alloy fork bridges, this provides a highly rigid composite structure for exact control of the front wheel, thus giving the G 310 R a directionally precise and secure steering response. In conjunction with the perfect set-up of the rear end, it ensures a high level of ride comfort as well as suitability for the most varied road surfaces and therefore a wide range of uses. The spring travel is 140 millimetres.

The new G 310 R is fitted with 5-spoke light alloy die-cast wheels in the sizes 3.0 x 17 inches at front and 4.0 x 17 inches at the rear. The tyre sizes are ample so as to ensure a safe, dynamic ride response in all conditions: 110/70 R 17 at the front and 150/60 R 17 at the rear.

High-performance brake system and ABS as standard for safe braking manoeuvres on poor roads.

Like all BMW motorcycles, the new G 310 R is fitted with ABS as standard. It combines a high-performance brake system with 2-channel ABS for efficient deceleration and short braking distances as well as efficient anti-locking – entirely geared towards optimum riding safety on poor or soiled roads.

At the front wheel, a single-disc brake with radially bolted 4-piston fixed caliper and a brake disc diameter of 300 millimetres ensures powerful and stable deceleration. At the rear, this function is performed by a 2-piston floating caliper in conjunction with a 240-millimetre brake disc. Steel-wrapped brake lines ensures stable pressure levels.

Sophisticated ergonomics for relaxed motorcycling pleasure.

The new G 310 R offers a markedly relaxed seating position for comfortable, stress-free motorcycling that allows for ease and concentration. As is characteristic of BMW Motorrad, all switches and controls are simple and secure to handle. Great importance was attached to simple and safe operation, taking into account the most diverse rider anatomies.

The design of the ergonomic triangle consisting of handlebars, footrests and seat ensures excellent control while also providing very good and comfortable feedback from the contact surfaces on the fuel tank and seat. At higher speeds, the standard windshield also relieves the rider’s upper body from the force of the airstream as well as ensuring an even wind flow at the helmet The low seat height of just 785 millimetres and the short inside leg length ensure that almost every motorcyclist will instantly feel at ease on the G 310 R. Meanwhile shorter or taller riders can draw on the range of BMW Motorrad optional accessories to select a lower variant with a seat height of 760 millimetres or else a higher, particularly comfortable seat at 815 millimetres.

Multifunction instrument panel with a range of features.

The G 310 R instrument cluster has a large liquid crystal display that offers excellent clarity and a wide range of information. The displays include the following: engine speed, road speed, gear, total kilometres, engine temperature, fuel tank level, remaining range, average fuel consumption, average speed, time.

3. Design and colour concept.

Compact, dynamic proportions.

The powerfully expressive design of the BMW G 310 R instantly reveals its agile, dynamic character, making a self-assured statement within its own segment. Reduced to the essentials, the proportions promise straightforward riding fun above all else: the BMW G 310 R is simply a perfect invitation to get on and ride away. This is because the newly developed engine of the BMW G 310 R is characterised by an innovative mounting geometry that signals compactness and agility. What is more, the short wheelbase, low front and high, light rear promise a dynamic, agile riding experience – ideal for manoeuvring in cramped urban traffic.

Despite its compactness, the BMW G 310 R comes over as large and mature within its segment. The small headlamp mask with striking headlamp, the powerful front section and the dynamic rear give the BMW G 310 R a selfassured presence on the road. Seen from the top, too, the BMW G 310 R looks more like a model from a larger capacity segment. The powerful surfaces of the fuel tank give it a clearly defined, muscular look from this angle, too.

Expressive surfaces.

Even when stationary, the precise lines and expressive interplay of light and shade on the side surfaces create an impression of motion and speed. All lines are directed towards the front wheel, thereby underscoring the easy handling of the BMW G 310 R. An especially striking feature here is the side wing contour which protrudes from the fuel tank. Below this, the precisely shaped surfaces echo characteristic elements of higher-capacity roadsters from the BMW Motorrad portfolio, though these are given a clearly distinctive interpretation – such as the side trim that is reminiscent of the S 1000 R.

In spite of the motorcycle’s obvious naked bike character, the generous surfaces nonetheless produce a closed, sporty silhouette. Here the large proportion of body colour and the joining of the body parts without visible bolts conveys the high-end quality feel of the BMW G 310 R.

Exclusive highlights.

The uncompromising striving for quality and high-quality solutions implemented down to the last detail reflect the high aspirations BMW Motorrad is pursuing with the BMW G 310 R. Exclusive highlights from the side view include the standard upside-down fork with golden slider tubes, the likewise gold-coloured brake calipers, and the rear wheel swinging arm.

The aluminium swinging arm with detailed modelling and lattice-like design conveys lightness and stability. In keeping with this, the 17″ rims with 5-spoke turbine design show just what rims can look like in this segment.

Within the rider’s direct field of vision, too, the BMW G 310 R features numerous visual and haptic highlights such as polished embossings and highend materials. The aluminium fork bridge is elaborately modelled as well as echoing the chiselled look of the footrests and rear wheel swinging arm in its own distinct form. On the fuel tank, a high-gloss “R” engraved in the plastic surface acts as an exclusive emblem signalling the fact that the bike belongs to the roadster segment. A further exclusive touch is added by the likewise high-gloss embossed inscriptions on the headlamp mask and number plate carrier.

Individualisation through a variety of colours and materials.

The BMW G 310 R is available in the three strikingly expressive colour variants Cosmic Black/PolarWhite non-metallic, Strato Blue metallic and the elaborately designed Pearl White metallic. These variants offer a spectrum ranging from sporty and modern right through to elegantly exclusive.

The basic colour variant Cosmic Black/Polar White metallic makes the most of the powerful contrast between black and white. With black as the base colour, white accentuation surfaces emphasise the modern lines of the body parts. In the engine area, additional contrast surfaces in silver add a touch of variety to the overall impression, lending a sense of lightness and modern flair to the side in the lower area.

In Strato Blue metallic, the second basic variant, the BMW G 310 R is presented in radiant blue. Depending on the occasion and the rider’s clothing this can give it an elegant, exclusive look or else a touch of sporty flair. The contrast surfaces in Titanium Grey and the silver sections in the area of the engine add variety to the overall impression while also lending a touch of modern appeal. In combination with the gold accentuations of the fork and brake calipers, the general appearance here is one of high quality.

The absolute highlight of the colour range is the top variant Pearl White metallic, subject to an additional charge. (OE). Pearl White is the base colour here – a white with a discreet sparkle effect – against which the BMW motor racing colours of blue and red are applied to create a striking accentuation graphic. The graphic runs from the fork base across the fuel tank and under the seat. What is more, a painted surface in high-gloss black provides the background for the striking interplay between the graphic and the paint finish on the side trim. Underneath, silver accentuation surfaces lighten up the dark engine area, adding a modern touch to it. The fork tubes and brake calipers provide golden accentuations as a perfect supplement to this colour variant.

4. Production and quality.

Developed in Munich by BMW Motorrad – produced in Bangalore, India by the cooperation partner TVS Motor Company.

The new BMW G 310 R is produced in Bangalore, India by the cooperation partner TVS Motor Company, India’s third largest motorcycle manufacturer with a production volume of some 2.5 million vehicles per year. The company has been committed to sustainability for many years and attaches great importance to adhering to defined social and environmental standards which go far beyond what is common practice in India.

TVS Motor Company is the flagship of the TVS Group, which is made up of more than 90 companies in total. These include numerous firms that enjoy an excellent reputation in the automotive sector as suppliers for well-known car makers. Many of these suppliers from within the TVS Group provide the components for the G 310 R.

Quality management and state-of-the-art production following the standards of the BMW Motorrad plant in Berlin-Spandau.

TVS Motor Company’s quality management system has been based on Japanese role models for many years. For the G 310 R, this system was extended to include the requirements and standards specific to BMW Motorrad, and within the area of quality management there are interdisciplinary teams from both companies working in close collaboration.

A dedicated production area has been set aside in the factory for production of the G 310 R. Mechanical production of the engine components is carried out on new, high-quality machine tools made by leading German manufacturers. BMW Motorrad was closely involved in an advisory capacity here and production is set up based on the model of the BMW Motorrad plant in Berlin-Spandau. The engine assembly line is completely new and fitted with cutting-edge automation and testing technology for every stage of the process. All the relevant work stages are monitored and automatically recorded with regard to size accuracy, tolerances and bolt-fitting values.

Assembly is carried out in a completely sealed, glazed area which can only be accessed via air locks so as to prevent any dirt from entering. At the end of the engine assembly line, each engine is put through a test bench run where all relevant parameters are measured including output.

Vehicle assembly is also carried out in a dedicated section of the factory reserved exclusively for BMW Motorrad. Here again, state-of-the-art assembly technology is deployed. The final inspection is performed according to BMW Motorrad standards and includes electronic functional testing as well as a final run on the roller test bench for every motorcycle. The roller test bench is also completely new and set up according to Berlin standards.

Furthermore, staff were specially selected and trained by TVS for production and assembly. Additional training programs were held for assembly workers together with colleagues from the BMW Motorrad plant in Berlin-Spandau over a period of more than a year prior to the start of serial production. From the very first motorcycle to come off the production line in India, they have also contributed to the high assembly standards and heightened quality awareness. All in all, production of the new BMW G 310 R is subject to the same quality criteria that apply to production at the BMW Motorrad plant in Berlin-Spandau.

5. Equipment program.

An individually harmonised range of BMW Motorrad optional accessories is provided which perfectly matches the overall concept of the G 310 R. Optional accessories are installed by the BMW Motorrad dealer or by customers themselves. These are features which can be retrofitted, too.

Optional accessories.

  • Low seat.
  • Comfort seat.
  • Luggage bridge.
  • 29-litre topcase “Basic” with retaining plate.
  • 30-litre topcase.
  • Centre stand.
  • LED turn indicators.
  • 12-volt socket.
  • Heated grips.