Deals of the Week

Every week (should the planets align) we search the intermanets to find the best deals on motorcycle clothing, gear, equipment, accessories and parts. This week brings up to 55% off a range of Bell helmets, big savings on Dainese full leather suits, 49% off Pirelli Diablo Scorpion tires and big discounts on AGV helmets.

Deal of the Week:

Helmets

Gear

Accessories

Weekly Deals Round-Up

Every week (approximately) we search the interwebs to find the best deals on motorcycle clothing, gear, equipment, accessories and parts. This week brings 25% off the Shark Race-R Pro Redding replica helmet, 43% of the Dainse D-Dry Jacket and nearly a third off Rev’it! RSR Gloves.

Deal of the Week:

Jackets

Helmets

Boots

Other Gear

AGV Announces the AGVisor, an LCD Visor Tinting System

Finding a way to shield your eyes from the strong glare of the sun hasn’t always been a simple process. The simplest no doubt is wearing sunglasses, but they don’t always fit well inside a helmet (or they constantly need adjusting while riding, meaning you need to flip the visor up to do so). Some helmets include a flip down visor, but there has been some concern (without any factual evidence, mind you) that making room for a flip down visor comprises helmet safety. Of course, you could always carry both a tinted and clear visor, but that’s probably the worst solution of all.

Bell introduced a nice solution by way of photo-chromatic visors that automatically adjusts the tint to lighting conditions – although when you go in and out of tunnels, it probably adjusts a little too slowly for our liking. But AGV have just announced a very cool (albeit expensive) solution titled AGVisor.

Debuted just a few days ago at SWISS-MOTO (Switzerland’s annual motorcycle expo), AGV says that their system is fast, efficient and doesn’t compromise helmet safety. As you can see in the video below, the function works instantaneously by pressing a button on the left side of the helmet. It’s basically the same principle behind Bell’s photo-chromatic system, but instead of adjusting by sunlight, it changes by electric current.

When powered on in tinted mode, the battery will last for around 12 hours. In standby mode, total battery life before charging is 55 hours. However, AGV have included a mechanical backup that allows you to change the visor tint from dark to clear if the battery runs flat.

It’s no doubt a very cool and clever system, but we’re not sold on any piece of technology that requires regular charging in order to work as it’s just another thing you need to keep on top of. Then there’s the price. It’s been announced that the visors will cost €200 each, or about $223. Considering a Bell photo-chromatic visor is about $120 and a cheap pair of sunglasses costs $20, that’s a huge amount of money for essentially the same thing (although with a quicker tinting action).

Initially, the AGVisor will be made available for the GT Veloce helmet, with other models such as the Corsa Pista and GP to follow.

 

5 Of The Best 5 Star Rated Helmets

If you’ve read our article from last week you’ll know that an expensive helmet doesn’t automatically make it a good helmet. But are all 5 star rated helmets created equal? In this article we look at what we think are the five best 5 star rated helmets, both budget and premium. Money might not buy you extra safety in the case of some helmets, but it can buy you comfort, quality and features.

Nitro Aikido – From $139.95

Given its rock bottom price the Nitro Aikido is one helmet that just can’t be ignored. If you want good head protection at the cheapest price then the Nitro Aikido is the helmet for you. And despite the cheap price, the majority of rider feedback is that it’s a decent all around helmet.

Positives:

  • Value for money
  • Comfortable
  • Aerodynamic. Minimal drag when turning the head at higher speeds
  • Misting/Fogging clears up quickly when at speed
  • Removable liner

Negatives:

  • Noisy – earplugs are a must
  • With vents open there is a fair bit of turbulence inside the helmet
  • Average to poor vision. The eye slot is shortened on the ends, cutting off peripheral vision and requiring the rider to turn their head more than other helmets.
  • Pinlock compatible but does not include a Pinlock insert

Nitro Aikido Five Best 5 Star Rated Helmets

Caberg Vox – From $125

Caberg is a helmet manufacturer you’ve probably never heard of which is a real shame – they have six helmets rated at 5 stars by SHARP and the most expensive is only £145 ($226). The Caberg Vox can actually be purchased at some online retailers for only $125 which actually makes it cheaper than the Nitro Aikido.

Positives:

  • Possibly the cheapest 5 star helmet you can buy
  • Built in sun visor
  • Removable liners

Negatives:

  • Average ventilation
  • Sun visor is prone to fogging
  • Average noise

Caberg Box Five Best 5 Star Rated Helmets

Shoei Qwest – From $366.99

Even though most helmets all look the same, Shoei somehow just manages to make their lids look that much better.  And while the Shoei Qwest is one of Shoei’s cheaper helmets, it still pretty much has all the features you’d want.

Positives:

  • Very lightweight
  • Very quiet

Negatives:

  • Some fogging of the visor when stationary
  • Venting not as good as the Shark Race R Pro or AGV Corsa

Shoei Qwest Five Best 5 Star Rated Helmets

Shark Race R – From $599.95

The top of the line helmet from Shark, it combines lightweight materials, race track aerodynamics and minimal wind noise in a highly attractive package. Shark might not have the same brand credentials as Arai or Shoei, but they make helmets just as good.

Positives

  • Minimal wind noise
  • Excellent ventilation
  • Lightweight
  • Comfortable
  • Almost as good as the AGV Corsa, but $200 cheaper

Negatives

  • Slight fogging in humid conditions
  • Padding tight around the cheeks

Shark Race R Pro Five Best 5 Star Rated Helmets

AGV Corsa – From $799.95

The most expensive helmet featured here at a RRP of $799.95, which means for the price you could buy around 6 Caberg Vox’s. But that’s the same as saying you could buy a dozen Toyota Camry’s for the same price as a Porsche 911. You get what you pay for and while the AGV Corsa has the same 5 star safety rating as the other helmets here, it’s leaps and bounds ahead in quality and other features compared to some of them.

Positives:

  • Excellent ventilation
  • Lightweight
  • Anti-lift rear spoiler (that dislodges in a crash)
  • Expanded eyeport for improved visability

Negatives:

  • Price
  • Better suited to the track than the street

AGV Corsa Five Best 5 Star Rated Helmets

 

Buying Motorcycle Gear from AliExpress – Is it Safe?

We all want the best we gear can get for the lowest possible price, and that’s why many bargain hunters end up buying their motorcycle gear from Aliexpress. But is it safe? Are the goods genuine? Are the prices too good to be true? We’ve bought a selection of gloves, jackets and pants over the past 18 months from the online superstore so you don’t have to and our conclusions should help prevent you from wasting your hard earned currency.

For those who haven’t heard of the website before, Aliexpress is the online retail arm of Alibaba, a massive Chinese e-commerce company that acts as a source for thousands of importers from all over the world to buy goods and then sell them locally. Most of the stuff you buy on eBay? It’s sourced from Alibaba at a wholesale level or Aliexpress for smaller players. At it’s initial public offering on the New York Stock Exchange, it was valued at $231 billion.  Amazon is only valued at $144 billion and in stark contrast, Alibaba is actually profitable.

You can buy motorcycle fairings, rearsets, sliders, decals, replacement parts and clothing, be it gloves, boots, jackets or helmets. But we’re not talking about t-shirts here that you buy for looks. Motorcycle protective clothing is for just that – protection. So are all the Alpinestars gloves and Dainese jackets genuine?

Some of the products you buy are obviously fake. Dodgy looking logos, sizing that’s completely wrong and exotic materials that are clearly not what they’re supposed to be. But some goods are so realistic that if you put them side by side with the same product at a retail store, you wouldn’t be able to tell them apart. Perhaps they are genuine – there is the potential they’ve come from the same factory as the full priced items but I’m basing that judgment at a superficial level. The stitching and dyes which hold everything together may very well be poor (and cheap) imitations which completely changes the structural integrity of the product. Here’s what we found.

Gloves

We purchased a number of gloves from Aliexpress as follows:

  • Alpinestars S1 (RRP of $159.95 on Revzilla, $29.95 on Aliexpress)
  • Dainese Full Metal RS (RRP of $349.95 on Motorcycle Supestore, $80.00 on Aliexpress)
  • RS Taichi RST369 (Now discontinued, but $39.99 on Aliexpress)
  • REV’IT Summit H20 (RRP of $134.99 on Bike Bandit, $49.99 on Aliexpress)

As you can see there’s a massive difference in price between what you can get on Aliexpress compared to general retail stores. So is it a case of too good to be true? Pretty much.

The RS Taichi gloves were the best out of the four. We honestly couldn’t tell the difference between them and the genuine article. And out of the four pairs of gloves we purchased, they’re the only ones we crash tested – numerous times. They held up perfectly. I have no doubt the carbon fiber palm sliders and knuckle protectors are just plastic, but nevertheless they did the job.

The next best is the REV’IT Summit H20 gloves. They look genuine, the feel genuine but for some reason they just seem off and I can’t put my finger on why. The Alpinestars S1’s looked genuine until you take a closer look. First of all they’re pleather, not leather. Secondly, you know they’re fake because the logos are in the wrong places and the holes on the wrists aren’t fully perforated.

 

Is An Expensive Helmet a Safe Helmet? A Look at Helmet Safety Ratings and Price

“If you have a $10 head, buy a $10 helmet. If your head is worth more, buy a Bell.” That was the famous ad that Bell ran in the 1970’s and it’s still often quoted today when people talk about motorcycle gear, especially motorcycle helmets. It sounds right – who puts their faith in something cheap over an expensive item, especially when it comes to safety? But how true is that today? Is that $700 Shoei really what you need to keep your head safe or can you get away spending only $150? We’ve collated as much data as we can and analysed the correlation between helmet prices and their safety and the results are pretty surprising.

We took our data from the UK Government organisation SHARP, the Safety Helmet Assessment and Rating Programme. It provides by far and away the most comprehensive motorcycle helmet safety testing data available freely online. It’s obviously UK centric though, so we’ve stripped out the helmets that aren’t readily available internationally. We also removed all models that appear to be discontinued and finally only included brands that had at least three helmets rated once the above criteria was met.

Below we have charted those remaining helmets, and you can them see by each helmet listed individually and by a brand as a whole. Hover your mouse over the individual circles to see the helmet name, its rating and its price. Note that the prices on the Y-Axis are in Pounds Sterling (£).

Now let’s do some analysis.

If we put a trend line through the graph like below, you can see that the trend is that the higher the helmet rating the higher the price, but only marginally. In fact the most expensive helmet in our data, the Arai RX-7 GP only receives a 4 star rating from SHARP, but costs £589, or around $1,000. Compare that to either the G-Mac Pilot or the Viper RS-33, both of which are the equally cheapest helmets in our data and cost only £40 or around $65. Like the Arai, they also receive a 4 star rating.

Helmet Safety and Price All Helmets

To demonstrate it even more starkly, the Schuberth S1 Pro is listed at £450 and only received a 2 star safety rating from SHARP. It received ‘Poor’ results for both left and right side impact tests and yet it is more expensive than all the 5 star rated helmets except three.

The cheapest 5 star helmet you can buy is the Nitro Aikido which costs £70 or around $120 on Amazon. The Nitro Aikido was first released back in 2011 and is still produced today. They’re a good example of why you shouldn’t take brands on face value either. If you’d previously heard about the Aikido and it’s great value for money, you may have assumed that the rest of the Nitro range was as good.  And while the Aikido is damn good for the price, it’s the company’s only 5 star helmet – they even have a few 2 star rated helmets for sale. In fact,  the safety of Nitro’s helmets almost increases as the price decreases:

Helmet Safety and Price Nitro Helmets

On the flipside, the most expensive helmet money can buy if you want a 5 star rated helmet is the AGV Corsa.  The AGV Corsa is listed at £550, or around $750 at Revzilla.  But if safety is your only concern and you really want to wear the same brand Rossi wears, you can save yourself $450 and buy the AGV Stealth. Again, this shows that helmet price doesn’t necessarily correlate with helmet safety.

Helmet Safety and Price AGV Helmets

Of the major brands by far and away the most disappointing is Schuberth. Not only is the average price of their helmets the most expensive of all the brands featured here, they also have no helmets with a safety rating of 5.  But they do have two helmets with a safety rating of 2. If there’s any example of expensive helmets not equalling safety then Schuberth is it.

Helmet Safety and Price Schuberth Helmets

So how much is your head worth? Well, if you’re short on funds, about £70 for a Nitro Aikido. But while a helmet like the Nitro Aikido provides the same amount of safety as the AGV Corsa or Shark Race R Pro which cost up to seven times more, does it make it necessarily a good helmet?

Of course not, and safety and price are just two of many factors you should consider. But don’t be fooled by the price (or brand) of a helmet. Never is the phrase ‘Buyer Beware’ more important than when it comes to protecting your head. If someone had asked you before reading this article if you thought a $700 Schuberth S1 Pro was safer than a $120 Nitro Aikido, I’m sure you would have gone for the former.

In part two of this story which will be published later in the week, we’ll take a look at the best five helmets that are rated 5 stars, including comfort, noise levels and price.